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The estimated stock on hand at the close of last season was 2,200 hhds., and this amount added to the crop of 236,547 hhds., would make a supply of 238,747 hhds. The distribution of this supply, as nearly as can be ascertained, has been as follows:

Hhds.

Shipments out of the State.....

.hhds. 53,000 Consumption of the city and neighborhood.....

18,000 Taken for refining in the city and State, including cistern bottoms

15,000 Stock now on hand in the State, estimated....

3,000 Leaving as the quantity taken for the West..

149,547 The quantity shipped to Atlantic ports is 42,000 hhds., against 45,000 hhds. last year, and 90,000 the year previous.

Besides the Louisiana crop there have been imported into the port of New Orleans from Cuba 1,781 hhds., 25,673 boxes, from Brazil 1,591 cases and boxes, 80 barrels, and 7,689 bags, and from Manilla 14,224 bags. The whole of the imports from Brazil and Manilla, and a great portion of those from Cuba, were for a St. Louis refinery. The crop of Texas last year, we have ascertained from good authority, was not far from 5,000 hhds., and there were about 2,000 hhds. produced in Florida, the greater part of which came to this market.

With respect to the growing crop, we have to remark that the accounts from the interior generally concur in representing the prospects of the "plant cane as very flattering, and in some sections the “rattoons" are said to give good promise, though as a general thing the latter are said to be, to a great extent, a failure, owing to the remarkably severe frosts of the winter. What the extent of the crop may be, however, can hardly be conjectured for some months to come, as many contingencies may arise, to its advantage or disadvantage. The annexed table gives the crop of each year for the last twenty-two years, and a reference to it will show great fluctuations in the product.

Hhds. 1851. 236,547 | 1840...

87,000 1850. 211,203 1839.

115,000 1849. 247,923 1838

70,000 1848. 220,000 1837.

65,000 1847. 240,000 1836..

70,000 1846.. 140,000 1835.

30,000 1845.. 186,650 1834.

100,000 1844. 200,000 1833.

75,000 1843. 100,000 1832

70,000 1842, 140,000 1829.

48,000 1841. 90,000 | 1828.

88,000 The crop of Texas is said to give highly favorable promise, and the yield is expected to be more than double that of last year.

In an elaborate statement made up at New-York, the consumption of the United States, for the year 1851, is put down at 321,736 tons. This is exclusive of about 40,000 lbs. of maple sugar, and of a large quantity of sugar made of for. eign molasses which we have no data for estimating.

MOLASSES. The product of molasses from the last cane crop, was, according to the statement of Mr. P. A. Champomier, unusually large, in proportion to the yield of sugar; it being estimated at seventy gallons per 1,000 lbs., against fifty gallons the season previous. Thus the whole product is set down at 18,300,000 gallons against 10,500,000 gallons the season previous. The increased yield is attributed to the immature condition of the cane, the ripening of which was retarded by late rains. Notwithstanding this very material addition to the supply, however, prices generally have been very well maintained, as will be seen on reference to the annexed table, which exhibits the highest and lowest points in each month for sales on the levee in barrels.

25

27

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Cents per gallon.

Cepts per gallon. Highest. Lowest.

Highest. Lowest. September.... 25 a 30 23 a 30 March....

15 26 14 October ... 23 30 20 28 April...

18

15 26 November 26 27 22 231 May.

24 281 20 28 December. 221 241 17 21 Jupe

23 28 20 28 January

17 21 15
20+ July..

18 28 15 28 February 20 25 15 21 | August

18 28 18 28 The sales on plantation generally, ranged from 19 a 20 cents per gallon in the cisterns, though the latter was the prevailing rate for prime crops, most of which were taken for western account by prior contract. There have again been importations from Cuba for refining purposes, and up to this date the quantity reaches about 800,000 gallons, against 1,200,000 gallons to the same date last year. Of our own crop of 18,300,000 gallons, there have been shipped to Atlantic ports 2,700,000 gallons, against 2,000,000 gallons last year; leaving 15,600,000 gallons as the quantity taken for the consumption of the West and South, which would indicate a remarkable increase over any previous year.

Tobacco. At the commencement of the commercial year which has just clo. sed, the stock of tobacco in this port (including all on shipboard not cleared) was 23,871 hhds., of which about 10,000 hhds. were in the hands of factors, the remainder being composed of strips and lugs for forwarding, and of parcels which had changed hands, and were awaiting opportunity for shipment. The quotations given in our last annual statement, were :For Frosted.....

Ib. 2} a 3
Lugs, factory.
Planters' do..

34 a 5
Leaf, inferior to common.

51 Fair to fine....

7 Choice and selections..

9 From the 1st September to the close of December, the demand was moderately fair; the arrivals during that time being about 5,000 hhds., while the sales exceeded 10,000 hhds. In prices there was a downward tendency from the middle of October, and on the 31st December our quotations were :For Frosted.......

...cents per lb. 2 a 29
Lugs, factory.
Plavters' do.

3 a 4
Leaf, inferior to common.

44 Fair to fine....

54 6 Choice and selections.

64 7 The first hogshead of the new crop reached here on the 18th October, and in January some few parcels of new caine to market, and found buyers at rates 1 to 1 cent below the closing figures of Dec., but it was not until the middle of March that any considerable arrivals took place. From that time until the end of April he receipts were upon a pretty liberal scale, and the demand at the same time was fair, and was freely met by factors generally. In this period buyers gradually obtained some further advantage in prices, and on the 1st May we quoted :For Lugs, factory.....

.cents per lb. 2 a 24 Planters' do..

3 3+ Leaf, inferior to commod.

34 47 Fair to fine....

44 Choice and selections.

53 6 Early in May a number of buyers who had previously held aloof, entered the market, and an active demand sprang up which continued unabated for some sixty days, the sales in that time reaching nearly 30,000 hhds. The consequences of these exceedingly heavy transactions were, that the stock on the market (notwithstanding the unusual extent of the receipts) was reduced to a very moderate

none.

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quantity, and that prices gradually improved, until at the commencement of July our figures were advanced to the following range:For Lugs, factory..

.cents per lb. 21 a 31 Planters'.

31 Leaf, inferior to common.

44 Fair to fine...

53 Choice and selections....

7 At about these rates some 6,000 hhds. changed hands during July, the demand being fair, though not animated, and the stock on sale being too limited to admit of any very extensive operations. During the past month the inquiry has been more brisk, and the sales reported embrace some 6,500 hhds., including some parcels which had previously changed hands, and were resold. Under the influence of this improved demand, prices have again taken a start upwards within the past three weeks, and we now quote, forLugs, factory....

..cents per lb. 3 a 34 Planters, ditto

31 41 Leaf, inferior to common.

44 53 Fair to fine.....

5$ 6 Choice and selections

61 71 We close our tables with a stock in port of 18,831 hhds., though the quantity immediately on sale is estimated not to exceed 4,000 hhds. It may be proper to remark, however, that in addition to this amount there are probably 6,000 to 8,000 hhds. held in second hand, which may, in certain contingencies, be again placed upon the market. The total receipts at this port since 1st September, as shown by our tables, are 89,675 hhds., which amount includes 11,740 hhds. strips and 2,118 hhds. steins. The quantity inspected since 1st September is 64,645 hhds., of which 5,615 hhds. were Mason County.

Early in the season it was very generally known that the crop would certainly be a large one, and in view of the experience of previous years as to the effect of a heavy accumulation of stock upon our market, a majority, both of shippers in the country and of factors here, were in favor of speedy sales. This course has been generally pursued, and its advantages have been fully made manifest. The extent of our receipts (which would have been several thousand hogsheads greater but for the low stage of water in the rivers above for several weeks past) shows that the estimates of the crop were about correct. Its quality, however, was probably over-estimated, as the reports received from the interior last fall led to the expectation of something unusually fine, whereas the receipts from most sections have been decidedly below the average quality of former years. And here we take the liberty again to call the attention of planters to the necessity, if they would protect their own interest, and the interest of the trade generally, of bestowing more care upon the handling, sorting, and prizing of their crops. Their negligence in these particulars has been a matter of serious complaint for some years past.

With regard to the growing crop, we have briefly to remark, that the accounts received thus far have been of a decidedly discouraging character. Complaints of scarcity of plants, of want of proper seasons for planting, and of long continued drought since the planting was made, have been very general, and we hear of no section of the tobacco-growing region (unless it may be Missouri) in which anything like an average crop is expected. It is quite too early, however, to determine what the extent of the crop is likely to be, and at a later period we may take occasion again to advert to its prospects.

Western PRODUCE.-In this department of our trade there is embraced a vast variety of products, which contribute largely to the value of our Commerce with the interior, but our limited space will only permit us to review briefly the course of the market in a few of the most prominent articles. There has been some increase in the supply of breadstuffs, as compared with the last year, and the average of prices has been lower. The receipts of flour are 927,212 bbls., against 941,106 last year, and of Indian corn they are equal to 3,750,000 bushels, against 3,300,000 bushels last year. Of wheat the supply has been light, and the receipts, which have been mostly to go forward to Alabama, Georgia, etc., have only reached 130,000 bushels, against 180,000 bushels last year. The few sales that have taken place have been at the extreme range of 65 a 85 cents, though mostly at about 70 cents per bushel. Of corn meal there has been received only 2,514 barrels, against 3,662 barrels last year. The total exports of flour, since 1st September, amount to 544,711 barrels, against 583,418 barrels to same date last year. Of this quantity, 138,569 barrels were shipped to Great Britain, 70,445 to West Indies, etc., and the remainder to coastwise ports. Of Indian corn the total exports have been equal to 2,182,000 bushels, against 1,300,000 bushels last year. Of this quantity 382,000 bushels were shipped to Great Britain and Ireland, 122,000 to the West Indies, etc., and the remainder to coastwise ports. The following tables will indicate the course of prices for flour and corn, as they present the highest and lowest points of the market in each month, the range being according to quality.

PRICES OF FLOUR.

PRICES OF CORN IN SACKS.

Per barrel.

Cents per bashels. Highest.

Lowest.

Highest. Lowest. September

$350 a 5 00 $3 374 a 4 75 85 a 56 32 a 55 October.

3 75 5 00 3 40 4 50 40 58 33 42 November

3 55 475 3 40 4 50 48 52 33 42 December.

3 90 4 75 3 55

4 375

50 56 41 46 January 4 00 550 3 60 5 371

54 67 44 47 February.

4 25

5 124 4 00 4 50 51 54 46 50 March

4 25 4 50 3 75 4 25 50 54 42 46 April.

3 75 4 124 3 30 3 90 48 50 42 46 May

3 60 3 80 3 25 3 75 47 53 40 47 June

3 80

3 45 4 124 48 53 45 52 July 3 75 4 25 3 50 3 874

50 62 48 52 August..

3 75 5 00

3 50

3 874 52 60 48 51 The annexed table shows the exports of breadstuffs from the United States to Great Britain and Ireland since 1st September, compared with the same period

4 375

last year :

Wheat....

1851-52. 1850–51. Flour

..barrels 5,359,882 1,379,643 Corn meal..

1,750

5,553 .. bushels

1,520,307 1,286,630 Corn..

1,547,383 2,197,253 With respect to the supply of breadstuffs for the coming year, it is likely to be most ample; for it is understood that the yield throughout the country has been more generally abundant than in any previous year, at least for a long period. Even in the Southern States, where the grain crops have been almost a total failure for two years in succession, the harvest is ample, and large sections of country, which have depended upon the West for supplies, are likely to have a surplus to send to market. The crops of Europe, also, are generally represented as giving favorable promise, and the probabilities would seem to indicate a lower range of prices than the American farmer has realized for some years past.

The article of pork has presented unusual interest the past season. declared that there was a further deficiency in the supply of hogs, as compared with the previous year, while it was evident that the consumption was rapidly on the increase, as the increase of population was large and constant, besides which the failure of the corn crops at the South had involved at the same time the failure of the usual home supply of pork, and on these considerations the market for hoge opened in the West at what appeared, to some at least, to be high prices. The sequel, however, has sustained the views of the purchasers, though we doubt whether any one anticipated so high a range of prices as the market has at

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tained within the past two months, a range that has scarcely been approached since 1838. In beef there has been some increase of supply, but prices, nevertheless, have ranged considerably higher than last year. The following tables show the highest and lowest points of the market, in each month :

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PRICES OF PORK.

MESS.

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PRIME.
Highest.

Lowest.
Highest.

Lowest.
Septemper.per bbl. $16 50 a 17 00 $16 00 a 16 50 $16 00 a 16 00 $15 00 a 15 60
October
15 25 16 00 14 00 14 50 14 50

13 00
November
14 75 15 00 13 50 14 25 13 50

13 00 December

14 50 15 00 12 50 13 50 1200 12 75 10 75 11 50 January 15 00 15 50 12 75 13 75 13 50

12 00 12 75 February 15 50 15 75 14 874 15 25 13 50

13 25 16 50 17 00 15 00 15 50 14 00

13 25 April 17 75 18 00 16 50 16 75 15 00

13 50 13 75 May

17 25 17 624 1675 17 00 15 00 15 50 14 50 June.. 20 00 21 00 17 00 17 50 18 50

15 00 15 50 July 20 00 21 00 19 75 20 50 18 00

18 00 August. 21 50 22 50 21 00 22 00 18 25

18 25

March...

PRICES OF BEEF.

MESS.

PRIME

Highest.

Lowest.
Highest.

Lowest.
September. per bbl. $14 50 a 15 00 $14 50 a 15 00 811 50 a 12 50 $10 50 a 11 00
October ....

14 50 15 00 14 00 15 00 11 50 12 50 11 50 12 50 November...

14 50 15 00 14 00 14 50 11 00 12 00 11 00 12 00 December

12 00 13 00 11 00 12 00 9 50 10 00 7 00 January

11 00 12 00 11 00 11 50 7 50 8 00 7 50 7 75 February

11 00 12 00 11 00 12 00 7 50 8 00 7 60 March.... 13 00 13 50 12 00

9 00 9 25 7 60 8 00 April.. 13 00 13 50 13 00 13 50 9 50 9 75 9 00

9 25 May

13 25 14 00 13 00 13 50 10 00 11 00 9 50 9 75 June

14 00 14 50 13 25 14 00 13 00 13 75 10 00 11 00 July

14 50 15 00 14 00 14 50 13 00 13 75 13 00 13 50 August.

14 50 15 00 14 50 15 00 13 00 13 50 13 00 13 50 The receipts of lard have rather exceeded those of last year, but the average, of prices has been about the same. The total exports since 1st September, (all packages being reduced to kegs) are equal to 792,543 kegs, against 738,956 kegs last year. Of this quantity 222,224 kegs were exported to foreign ports, against 188,353 kegs last year, Great Britain taking 61,923 kegs, against 41,663 last year. The course of the market will be observed by reference to the annexed table, which shows the highest and lowest points in each month, the lowest figures being for inferior, in barrels, and the highest for prime, in kegs :

PRICES OF LARD,

Lowest.

61 11

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Cents per pound.

Cents per pound.
Highest. Lowest.

Highest.
September... 81 a 12. 84 a 12

March...

7 & 9

6 a 9 October .. 83 12 8 101 April.

7 11 61 94 November

101 6} 9
May..

64 11
December.
61 84 6 8

June..

8 107 7 104 January

94 5
81 July

8
111

8 83
February
6 94 5
9 August .

12 LEAD.-The discovery of gold in California has greatly interfered with the production of this article, and our receipts the past year have fallen to 267,564 pigs, which is the lowest amount since 1837. Our largest receipts were 785,000 pigs in 1846–47. The great bulk of the receipts has been forwarded to Northern cities, the sales in this market scarcely reaching 20,000 pigs for the entire season. The extreme range of prices has been $3 75 per 100 lbs. in October, and $4 70

10 13

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