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the country, when the change in the nominal value of this description of property bas been so gradual, under a prosperity so marked and so long continued. The appreciation of landed and improved property has been confined almost esclusively to localities affected by unusual enterprise, and has not extended in any considerable degree to lands or other property beyond this range of induence. Those who have retained a vivid remembrance of former inflations, will find nothing in the present at all analogous to the speculations then in vogue. New cities laid out ander water, and commercial depots staked off upon wild prairie lands, would not now prove inviting investments. We have it is true, now and then, a scheme almost as chimerical, and here and there a railroad project has a foundation about as hopeful; but the majority of our business men are clear from any hallucination upon these subjects, and rash speculations are not in the fashion.

The money market too, has been less excited than might have been anticipated with such an influx of gold. There have been neither extraordinary expansions or fluctuations in the currency, and much less disturbance than usual in monetary affairs. The supply of capital has been abundant and during most of the time at a range rather below the legal rates of interest; but there has been no such plethora as to glut the market, and lead of necessity to doubtful investments. The amount of coin added to the circulation of the country during the last four and a half years, or since the gold in California was discovered, (besides what has been taken for export,) is nearly $100,000,000. This includes the foreign coin which has been brought here within that time, as well as that of domestic production. This large amount of specie has been distributed through the country, and has exerted a very healthful check upon the circulation of bank. notes. Our readers may be curious to know in what proportion the amount on deposit at the great commercial centers has kept pace with the supply, and for this purpose we annex a tabular comparison at the periods named. The fluctuation between the banks and sub-treasury is caused by the withdrawals from the former for the payment of duties, and the deposit of the amount again when it is disbursed to public creditors.

DEPOSITS OF SPECIE AT NEW YORK.
Date.

In banks, In Sub-Treasury. Total. September 9, 1852 ...

$9,493,000 $6,735,000 $16,228,000 June 26, 1852.

12,152,000 4,340,000 16,492,000 May 26, 1852.

13,090,000 3,876,000 16,966,000 March 27, 1852..

9,716,000 2,533,000 12,249,000 December 20, 1851

7,364,000 2,660,000 10,024,000 September 25, 1851..

5,865,000 4,067,000 9,932,000 September 8, 1851...

7,113,000 3,430,000 10,543,000 July 23, 1851..

7,843,000 2,051,000 9,894,000 May 13, 1851

7.967,000 4,400,000 12,367,000 May 15, 1850

8,828,000 4,711,000 13,539,000 September 11, 1849..

8,117,000 8,600,000 11,717,000 May 19, 1849

8,238,000 2,139,000 10,377,000 September 29, 1848..

4,608,000 2,401,000 7,009,000 May 13, 1848

6,413,000 468,000 6,881,000 The large amount as shown at the few latest dates given above, is about as much as can be profitably employed, with the present amount of capital. There is however a manifest advantage in the introduction of the increased circulation of coin among the masses of the people. The exports of the pre

cious metals have not kept pace with the supply, the latter having increased during the present year while the former has diminished, as will be seen by the following comparison :

Exports

Philadelphia. from New York. Eight months of 1852....

$32,711,377 $18,531,341 Eight months of 1851..

31,664,312 27,771,129

Coinage at

Increase...

$1,047,065 dec. $9,239,788 We also annex a monthly statement of the shipments of specie from New York to foreign ports, since the discovery of gold in California :

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Total....... $11,034,786 $4,803,450 $9,982,948 $13,743,209 Since our last, the annual statement of the cotton crop of the United States has been prepared, and we annex some particulars, compared with the sumn

mmary of former years :-TOTAL RECEIPTS OF COTTON INTO THE VARIOUS PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

1851–2. 1850-1. 1819–50. 1818-9. 1817-8. 1816-7. 1815-6. New Orleans 1,373,464 933,369 781,886 1,093,797 1,190,733 705,979 1,037,144 Mobile.. . 649,449 451,748 350,952 518,706 436,336 323,462 421,966 Florida..

188,499 181,204 181,344 200,186 153,776 127,852 141,184 Texas

64,052 45,820 31.263 38,827 39,742 8,317 27,008 Georgia .. 325,714 322,376 343,635 391,372 254,825 242,789 194,911 S. Carolina. 476,614 387,075 384,265 458,117 261,752 350,200 251,405 N. Carolina. 16,242 12,928 11,861 10,041 1,518 6,081 10,637 Virginia, &c... 20,995 20,737 11,500 17,550 8,952 13,991 16,282

Total crop... 3,016,029 2,355,257 2,096,706 2,728,596 2,347,634 1,778,651 2,100,537

TOTAL FOREIGN EXPORTS OF COTTON FROM UNITED STATES.

1851-2. 1850-1. 1819-50. 1818-9. 1847-8. 1816-7. 1815-6. Great Britain... 1,668,749 1,418,265 1,106,771 1,537,901 1,324,265 830,909 1,102,369 France...... 421,375 301,358 289,627 368,259 279,172 241,486 369,703 N. of Europe.. 168,875 129,492 72,156 165,458 120,348 75,689 86,692 Other for. ports. 184,647 139,595 121,601 156,226 134,476 93,138 118,028

Total..... 2,443,646 1,938,710 1,590,155 2,227,844 1,858,261 1,241,222 1,666,792
The home consumption has advanced from 404,108 bales in 1850-51, to

Year.

Year.

603,029 bales in 1851-52, an increase of nearly 50 per cent. This branch of home manufacture is now prosperous, and nearly all of the mills are fully engaged. The average price of cotton at Mobile for the last season, taking the grades of ordinary to middling fair, as compared with former seasons, has been as follows:Average.

Average. 1845-6... 67 a 81 / 1849-50....

108 a 11 1846-7. 117 | 1850-51..

104 1847-8. 54 78 | 1851-52..

75 1848-9.

7 The receipts of gold from California are as heavy as usual, but owing to a delay in the arrival of one of the steamships throwing a large shipment forward into September, the total for the previous month appears less than was anticipated.

We annex a statement of the deposits and coinage at the Philadelphia and New Orleans mints, for the month of August; a more extended statement of the total receipts and coinage at all the mints up to the 1st August, will be found in another part of the present number :

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Dollars...

1,1010 $1,100 Half dollars..

16,100 7,550 Dimes.....

100,000 $10,000 62,500 6,250 Half dimes

70,000 3,500 Three-cent pieces

1,436,600 43,098 Total silver coinage........ 100,000 $10,000 1,585,300 $61,498 Total coinage ...

109,500 200,000 2,078,274 4,346,885 There was no copper coinage during the month. The total deposits of California gold for coinage at our mints since 1848 is about $138,000,000, and the total production of the mines since their discovery is about $205,000,000.

The increased demand for foreign goods, as already noticed, has tended to increase the imports. At New York the value of merchandise (exclusive of specie,) received from foreign ports during the month of August, is $1,976,344 greater than for August 1851, and $4,228,027 greater than during the same month of 1850. We annex a comparison for three years :

IMPORTS ENTERED AT NEW YORK FROM FOREIGN PORTS FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST.

1850.
1851.

1852. Entered for consumption

$9,034,284 $11,279,004 $13,711,421 Entered for warehousing

1,743,211 1,358,089 464,962 Free goods.

246,249 638,334 1,075,388 Specie.....

3,467,684 186,503 56,917 Total entered at the port.... $14,481,428 $13,461,930 $15,308,688 Withdrawn from warehouse..

1,716,055 1,262,245

1,329,991 The item of specie under the date of 1850 includes the receipts of California gold, which up to November of that year, having cleared from Chagres, were entered as from a foreign port. Of the increased imports as shown above in comparison with the previous year, $679,290 were in dry goods, and the remainder in general merchandise. We annex a comparison of each item :IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE AT NEW YORK FOR AUGUST.

1850. 1851. 1852. Dry goods.......

$7,803,131 $7,200,591 $7,879,881 General merchandise....

3,220,613 6,074,836 7,371,890

Total merchandise.....

$11,023,744 $13,275,427 $15,251,771 The increase for the month of August, however, is not sufficient to make up for the previous decline, and the falling off in the total imports since January Ist is $10,810,765, as compared with the previous year, and $13,131,620 as compared with 1850.

IMPORTS ENTERED AT NEW YORK FROM FOREIGN PORTS FOR EIGHT MONTHS ENDING AUGUST 31.

1850.
1851.

1852. Entered for consumption..

$72,288,772 $82,041,898 $72,209,450 Entered for warehousing

11,659,644 9,845,001 5,916,630 Free goods

6,207,603 6,803,459 9,335,827 Specie

12,522,173 1,666,979 2,085,165

Total entered at the ports...... $102,678,192 ·$100,357,337 $89,546,572
Withdrawn from warehouse.

7,094,156 8,132,230 10,952,568 The large amount of specie as shown in the statement for 1850, is owing to the California gold then included in the returns. We annex a statement of the relative receipts of merchandise :

IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE AT NEW YORK FOR EIGUT MONTHS.

Dry goods.....
General merchandise

1850.
$48,217,908
41,938,111

1851.
$49,440,808
49,249,550

1852. $42,374,175 44,587,242

Total........

$90,156,019 $98,690,358 $87,461,407 It 'will be noticed, that the entries for warehousing have fallen off materially, the receipts being wanted for immediate consumption: while the withdrawals have been larger, leaving the stock of merchandise in bond much smaller than usual. This is especially true in the receipts of dry goods: the entries for warehousing in the month of August, being but $252,896, against $1,142,567 for August, 1851, and $798,787 for August, 1850. The following is a correct classification of this description of imports :

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST.

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION,

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1850. Manufactures of wool...

$2,254,069 Manufactures of cotton..

943,925 Manufactures of silk ....

2,803,145 Manufactures of flax .

619,777 Miscellaneous dry goods

383,468 Total......

$7,004,384 WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUBE.

1850. Manufactures of wool ...

$453,417 Manufactures of cotton..

201,480 Manufactures of silk

146,737 Manufactures of flax ...

46,838 Miscellaneous dry goods

8,912 Total.....

$857,384 Add entered for consumption

7,004,384 Total thrown on the market........ $7,861,768

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ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING.

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1850. 1851. 1852. Manufactures of wool ...

$368,198 $495,957 $86,890 Manufactures of cotton..

181,452 143,970 45,018 Manufactures of silk ...

181,543 371,662 72,579 Manufactures of flax .

70,028 92,295 19,873 Miscellaneous dry goods..

7,526 38,693 28,586 Total......

$798,747 $1,142,567 $252,896 Add entered for consumption

7,004,384 6,058,024 7,626,985 Total entered at the port....... $7,803,131 $7,200,591 $7,879,881 The difference in the comparative value thrown upon the market, as already explained, is much greater than the difference in the total receipts, owing to the fact that the former includes a portion of the arrivals of the preceding year, which were suffered to lie in warehouse owing to the glut of foreign goods in the market. The following is a classification of the total imports of dry goods since January 1st: IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK FOR EIGHT MONTHS FROM JANUARY 1st.

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION.

1850. 1851. 1862. Manufactures of wool....

$12,146,835 $10,672,763 $9,993,683 Manufactures of cotton..

8,473,899 7,748,294 6,955,869 Manufactures of silk

15,236,295 18,274,613 14,949,433 Manufactures of flax

5,787,611 4,684,183 4,038,676 Miscellaneous dry goods....

1,769,876 2,755,878 3,029,139 Total...

$43,414,516 $44,235,721 888,966,790

WITHDRAWN FRON WAREHOUSE,

1850.
$1,177,467

1851.
$1,198,671
1,130,186

1852.
$1,300,626

Manufactures of wool.
Manufactures of cotton..
Manufactures of silk

955,010
835,748

980,616

1,221,655 1,641,819

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