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EXPORTS OF TOBACCO FROM NEW ORLEANS FOR TWO YEARS COMMENCING 1ST SEPTEMBER,

AND ENDING 31ST AUGUST. Whither exported. 1851-2. 1850-1. Whither exported.

1851–2. 1850-1. Liverpool ........hhds. 7,844 6,457 New York....

13,347 10,087 London ... 5,197 6,192 Boston..

1,941 1,594 Glasgow & Greenock...

Providence, R. I... Cowes, Falmouth, &c... 982 574 Philadelphia..

1,296 118 Cork, Belfast, &c

Baltimore...

385 754 Havre....

9,056 659 Portsmouth.. Bordeaux

1,916 517 Other coastwise ports... 230 291 Marseilles.

2,976 3,006 Western States..... Nantes, Cette & Rouen. Amsterdam...

1,157

Total .......... 93,715 54,501 Rotterdam & Ghent.. 222 712

RECAPITULATION. Bremen ....

15,516 7,071 Antwerp, &c.

7,618 570 Great Britain...... 14,023 13,223 Hamburg 476 75 France...

13,948

4,182 Gottenburg.

1,229 941 North of Europe 26,814 9,393 Spain and Gibraltar 7,662 7,454 S. of Europe and China. 21,731 13,859 Havana, Mexico, &c....

Coastwise.

17,199 13,844 Genoa, Trieste, &c.... 11,134 5,613 China...

Total........... 93,715 54,501 Other foreign ports 3,533 816 EXPORTS OF SUGAR FROM NEW ORLEANS FOR TWO YEARS, (UP THE RIVER EXCEPTED,) FROM

1ST SEPTEMBER TO 31ST AUGUST.

1851-2.

1850-1. Whither exported.

Hhds. Bbls. Hhds. Bbls. New York.....

18,225 134 13,595 655 Philadelphia....

6,489 946 10,264 867 Charleston, S. C.

3,524 1,685 3,517 660 Savannah..

729 99 1,702
Providence and Bristol, R. I...
Boston....

611
21

733 27 Baltimore..

6,400 38 3,670 237 Norfolk ...

4,585 338 Richmond and Petersburg, Va..

4,072 120 Alexandria, D.C....

1,156

552 Mobile..

5,327

3,840 2,266 A palachicola and Pensacola..

1,399 416 1,071 254 Other ports.....

2,348 2,857 1,131 3,469 Total .....

50,793 6,534 44,147 8,644 EXPORTS OF MOLASSES FROM NEW ORLEANS FOR TWO YEARS, (UP THE RIVER EXCEPTED,) FROM 1ST SEPTEMBER TO 31ST AUGUST.

1851-2.

1860-1. Whither exported.

Hhds, Bbls. Hhds. Bbls. New York.

130 26,703 509 22,646 Philadelphia...

93 6,384

7,735 Charleston, S c..

9,519

7,031 Savannah,

2,873

2,981 Providence and Bristol, R. I..

319 113 Boston...

1,409

2,172 Baltimore

11,081

2,862 Norfolk ...

41 5,323

2,313 Richmond and Petersburg, Va. Alexandria, D. C...

2,127

031 Mobile.

10,398 Apalachicola and Pensacola..

16,187

7,207

4,578 Other ports.....

5,151 118

3,677 Total.....

583 94,107 636 67,024

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EXPORTS OF FLOUR, PORK, BACON, LARD, BEEF, LEAD, WHISKY, AND CORN, FOR THE YEAR

ENDING 1ST SEPTEMBER, 1852.

Flour, Pork, Bacon, Lard, Beef, Lead, Whisky. Cora, Ports.

bble, bbls. hbde, kegs. bols. Pigs. bols. sacks. New York..... 94,638 57,356 12,685 250,738 9,295 149,781 6,553 133,488 Boston...... 61,124 62,702 5,431 208,613 12,285 73,895 1,815 148,524 Philadelphia

24 4,949 2,772 20,686 200 31,118 1,888 13,905 Baltimore 14,164 2,334 32,318

2,538 Oth. coastw. ports. 179,911 25,846 26,173 61,664 752 1,645 68,311 336,719 Great Britain..... 138,569 1,263

61,923 15,109

192,288 Cuba...... 6,681 946 812 158,447 15

37,466 Other foreign ports 63,764 5,622 96 2,154 551 500 21 12,384

Total... ....

544,711 172,748 50,303 792,543 38,207 256,939 81,156 874,774

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COMPARATIVE PRICES OF MIDDLING TO FAIR COTTON AT NEW ORLEANS ON TIE FIRST OP

EACH MONTH DURING A PERIOD OE FIVE YEARS.
1851-2. 1850-1. 18 19-50. 1848-9. 1847-8.
Cents.
Ceais.

Cents.
Cepts.

Cents, September...... 9 a 10 9 a 11 94 a 111 54 a ..

104 a 12 October....

8 97 124 135 9 12 57 7 10 11 November.. 7 81 134 145

9 11

5 6 73 81 December

8$ 137 14 104 111 51 61 61 January

8 12 14} 108 114 58 64 64 February

84 121 137 11} 121 67 77 65 March..

9 101 13

101 121 63 71 6} April.

9 101 124 105 12 6 75 61 May 93 94 117 1113 67 71

61 June

91
8% 11
11$ 131 7

81 0} 71 July

97

8 104 114 131 7 84 51 7+ August..

91

7 95 12+ 135 9

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COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SUGAR, MOLASSES, FLOUR, CORN, AND PORX, ON THE FIRST OF EACH
MONTH, FOR THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST, 1852.

Pork,
Sugar. Molasses.

Flour.
Mese.

Prime.
Cents.
Cents.
Dollars. Dollars.

Dollars. September

34 a 61 23 a 30 34 a 5 16} a 17 15 a 151 October,

34 61 23 30 34 44 157 16 15 154 November.

S

18 27 3 44 131 141 13 December... 21 6 234 24 34 44

14 15

none. January.

2

17 204 37 5 14 144 12 124 February

2 5 15 204 4 54 144 157 13} March... 21 57 20 25 43 41 15 151

131 13+ April. 21 54 15 26

4} 16! 164 134 134 May

27 54 20 28 31 34 177 178 15 June 31 6 23 28 36 37 17 171

15 16+ July. 37 6 20 28 34 4+ 20

201

18 August..

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31 6 18 28 31 37 194 203 18

COMPARATIVE ARRIVALS, EXPORTS, AND STOCKS OF COTTON AND TOBACCO AT NEW ORLEANS,

FOR TEN YEARS, FROM 1ST SEPTEMBER EACH YEAR.
Cotton, bales.

Tobacco, hhds.
Years.
Arrivals. Exports. Stocks. Arrivals. Exports,

Stocks. 1851-52.... 1,429,183 1,435,815 9,758 89,675 93,715 18,831 1850-51.

995,036 997,458 15,390 64,030 54.501 23,871 1849-50.... 837,723 838,591 16,612 60,304 57,955 14,842 1848-49... 1,142,382 1,167,303 15,480 52,335 52,896 13,293 1847-48.. 1,213,805 1,201,897 37,401 55,882 60,364 14,851 1846-47..

740,669 724,508 23,493 55,588 50,376 22,336 1845-46.. 1,053,633 1,054,857

6,832 72,896 62,045 17,924 1844-45... 979,238 984,616 7,556 71,493

68,679 7,673 1843-44.... 910,854 895,375 12,934 82,435 84,249 1842-43.... 1,089,642 1,088,870 4,700 92,509 89,891

4,859 4,873

1852.

men from various sources, to which we invite the attention of all who are interested. The production of coffee at sundry times is estimated by various authorities to be as follows:-

1841. 1813. 1848. 1851. Brazil million pounds

160

174 270 300 300 Java

112 125 140

100

120 St. Domingo.

25
38
35
40

30 Cuba and Porto Rico

56
50
50
30

25 British West Indies

12
10
12
7:

6 French & Dutch West Indies.

6
7

5 Sumatra....

12
15
10
10

8 Mocha, &c. .

10
8

5

3 Ceylon...

10
15
25
25

30 Laguyra, &c...

25
30
30
25

20 Costa Rica

3
5
5

5

2

Total...

430 471 587 559 548 The consumption of coffee in Europe by the average of various authorities in 1848, was 400,000,000 lbs.; the consumption of the United States and British America in 1848, was estimated to be 150,000,000 lbs. ; total consumption in 1848,550,000,000 lbs.

The increase of consumption in Europe is estimated to be 24 per cent per annum, which would give for 1852, 440,000,000 lbs.; the increase in the United States is estimated to be 74 per cent per annum, which would give for 1852, 200,000,000 lbs.; total consumption 1852, 640,000,000 lbs.

The stock of coffee in Europe in first hands on July 1st, was 125,000,000 lbs., or about 34 months' supply.

The stock of coffee in the United States in first hands, on July 1st, was 25,000,000 lbs., or about 11 months' supply.

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AMERICAN TRADE WITH CADIZ, SPAIN. We are indebted to ALEXANDER Burton, United States Consul, for the following statement of American vessels arriving at the port of Cadiz, for the six months ending June 30th, 1852:

Crew. Date of Arrival. Name.

Where from,

Tong-95ths. Am. For. January 15 Bark Columbia...

Charleston...

288.82 9 3 19 Ship Berlin

New Orleans,.. 613.02 14 25 Ship Robert...

Havre...

777.65 16 4 February 5 Ship H. H. Boody...

Alicant

664.86 13 6 19 Ship Euphrasia .....

Havre..

486.75 11 3

Havre.. 19 Ship Chs. Humberston...

1,099.74 16 7 March 13 Brig Itasca....

Wilmington...

242.30 14 Bark Commodore ...

New York..

199.12
24 B'g. Sch. Helen F. Ryder... Wilmington... 195.36 8
26 Brig Smyrna...

New York,

196.28 7 1 26 Ship Squantum ..

New Orleans... 646.74 15 5 April 7 B'g. Sch. Prairie..

Wilmington... 190.07 7 2 4 Ship Ashburton..

New Orleans... 449.23 11

Boston.... 4 Ship Ascutna...

428.82 12 1 18 Ship Brutus.....

New Orleans... 549.50 11 6 18 Ship Essex...

Genoa..

698.80 16 18 Bark Hesper

London....

891.75 11 June 2 Brig Hollander..

New York.

267.37 9 1 5 Bark Tyringham

Liverpool...

608.45 13 4 Havre

658.88 16 Ship Chasca.....

16 4 16 Ship Robert Hooper..

London..

756.81 15 2 Havre

299.50 21 Brig Athens....

12

10,710.42 256 67 Total, 22 vessels, of which number,

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May

ION ANCO O M S RO MONOSO

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10

12

Vesls. Tons. Men.

6,443 174 Entered from European ports in ballast.
4,267 149

the United States with cargo composed of –

Staves... 208 lorg thousand. 22 10,710 323

Ice.....

200 tons. Tobacco.. 3,080 bhds. For account Rosin..

420 barrels of the Spanish Ship Timber... 6 cargoes. ) Go, contracts. THE CLEARANCES WERE AS FOLLOWS:

Vessels. Tons.

Men. For the United States with cargo.

9,588 275 European ports in ballast.

1,122 47

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THE EXPORTS BY AMERICAN VESSELS WERE To the United States, Salt...

527 lasts, or 37,944 bushels equal Wine

310 pipes.

thereto. Liquorice Paste.

336 cases. Cork and Corkwood. 297 bales. Lead.......

50 tons. During the last six months 15 foreign vessels Lave arrived at Cadiz from the United States (8 English, 4 Swede, 2 Sicilian, and one Russian,) with cargoes consisting of 343,000 staves, six cargoes of ship timber, and 118 barrels of rosin, the rosin and timber for account of government contractors. Within the same period 12 vessels (11 English and 1 Swede,) have touched at Cadiz for the Atlantic ports of the United States, with salt 603 lasts, or 43,416 buehels, 324 pipes wine, 355 cases liquorice, 736 bales cork and corkwood, and 1,752 pigs lead; and for California, two cargoes of Eng. lish, French, and Spanish merchandise.

COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.

OF IMPORTS IN ORIGINAL PACKAGES EXPORTED TO MEXICO.

AN ACT AUTHORISING IMPORTED GOODS, WARES, AND MERCHANDISE, ENTERED AND BONDED

FOR WAREHOUSING IN PURSUANCE OF LAW, TO BE EXPORTED BY CERTAIN ROUTES TO PORTS OR PLACES IN MEXICO.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That any imported goods in the original packages, which shall have been duly entered and bonded, in pursuance of the warehousing act, of sixth August, eighteen hundred and forty-six, may be withdrawn from warehouse at any time within two years from the original importation for immediate exportation without payment of duties, under the provisions of the act aforesaid, to Chihuahua in Mexico, by the routes designated in the first section of the act of third March, eighteen hundred and forty-five, or by such other routes as may be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury; and likewise, that any imported merchandise duly entered and bonded at Point Isabel, in the collection district of Brazos de Santiago, or imported and bonded at any other port of the United States, and transported thence in bond and duly re-warehoused at Point Isabel, in pursuance of the warehousing law of August sixth, eighteen hundred and forty-six, may be withdrawn from warehouse at any time within two years from the date of original importation into the United States for immediate exportation, without payment of duties under the provisions of the warehousing act aforesaid, to ports and places in Mexico, by land or water, or partly by land and partly by water, or by such routes as may be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That any imported merchandise duly entered and bonded at any port of the United States, may be withdrawn from warehouse at any time within two years from the date of importation, without payment of duties, in pursuance of the provisions of the warehousing law of sixth August, eighteen hun. dred and forty-six, for immediate exportation to San Fernando, Paso del Norte, and

Chihuahua, in Mexico, through the port of La Vaca, in the collection district of Saluria in the State of Texas, and be transhipped inland thence to San Antonio in said State, and from the latter place to the destinations in Mexico aforesaid, either by way of Eagle Pass, the Presidio del Norte, and San Elizario, all on the Rio Grande; and the Secretary of the Treasury shall be, and is hereby authorized, to prescribe such regulations, not inconsistent with law, as he may deem proper and necessary, respecting the packing, marking, inspection, proof of due delivery at their foreign destinations, of the imports authorized by this and the foregoing sections of this act, to be exported from warehouse to ports and places in Mexico, and for the due protection in other respects of the public revenue.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Treasury shall appoint inspectors of the customs to reside at San Antonio, Eagle Pass, the Presidio del Norte, and San Elizario, or at such other points on the route as he may designate, not exceeding four in number, who shall each receive an annual salary of two hundred and fifty dollars, and who shall make a report semi-annually to the Secretary of the Treasury, of all the trade that passes under inspection, stating the number of packages, the description of goods, their value, and the names of the exporters.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That no goods, wares, or merchandise, exported out of the limits of the United States, according to the provisions of this act, shall be voluntarily landed or brought into the United States; and on being so landed or brought into the United States, they shall be forfeited, and the same proceedings shall be had for their condemnation, and the distribution of the proceeds of their sales, as in other cases of forfeiture of goods illegally inported; and every person concerned in the voluntary landing or bringing such goods into the United States, shall be liable to a penalty of four hundred dollars.

Seo. 5. And be it further enaeted, That all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with the provisions of the foregoing act, be, and the same are, hereby repealed.

Approved August 30, 1852.

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Since the passage of the foregoing act, the following circular from the Treasury Department, has been forwarded to the collectors and other officers of customs, explanatory &c. of the provisions of said act:CIRCULAR INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS AND OTHER OFFICERS OF THE CUSTOMS.

TREASURY DepaRTMENT, September 13th, 1852. The attention of the collectors and other officers of the customs, is called to the following instructions, to be pursued in carrying into effect the provisions of the annexed Act of Congress, approved 30th August, 1892, entitled “ An Act authorizing imported goods, wares, and merchandise, entered and bonded for warehousing in pursuance of law, to be exported by certain routes, to ports and places in Mexico.”

1st. Directly by water to ports or places in Mexico lying on the sea coast or Rio Grande.

2d. By land or water from Point Isabel to Brownsville, or Loredo; thence by water to places in Mexico lying on the Rio Grande. No goods, under transportation, to be allowed warehousing privileges at either Brownsville or Loredo.

The first section of the before-mentioned act, modifies so much of the act allowing drawback on goods exported to Chihuahua, &c., approved 3d March, 1845, and likewise so much of the act to establish the collection district of Brazos de Santiago, as requires the duties to be paid prior to exportation thereof, and authorizes any imported goods, in the original packages, which shall have been duly entered and bonded in pursuance of the Warehousing Act of 6th August, 1846, to be withdrawn from warehouse, at any time within two years from date of original importation, for immediate exportation, without payment of duties. The section mentioned also modifies the pro visions of the Act of 1849, respecting the transportation of goods by land from Point Isabel to Fort Brown, and authorizes their transportation from the first mentioned place to ports and places in Mexico, by land or water, or partly by land and partly by water, or by such routes as may be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury.

Until otherwise directed by the Department, the exportation of warehoused goods for immediate transportation, from Point Isabel to Mexico, will be by the following routes, to wit:

Goods, wares, and merchandise, proposed to be exported to San Fernando, Paso del Norte, and Chihuahua, by the routes indicated in the second section of the Act, VOL. XXVII-NO, IV.

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