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Total.....

180,000 $18,000 1,723,400 $64,607 Total coinage...... 221,000 78,000 2,318,477 4,879,760 There has been no copper coinage during the month. The receipts of gold in California, or at the mints, show no symptoms of a decline, notwithstanding there has been a large emigration from our Pacific coast to Australia.

In our last we asserted that the imports for September would show a consid. erable increase over the corresponding month of last year. The official entries have since been completed, and we are enabled to present our usual summary, which fully corroborates our statement. The imports at some of the lesser ports show a trifling decrease, but not sufficient to prove of any account in a general comparison. The following is a comparison of the receipts at New York. FOREIGN IMPORTS ENTERED AT NEW YORK FOR SEPTEMBER.

1850.
1851.

1852. Entered for consumption

$8,192,761 $8,384,172 $11,095,827 Entered for warehousing

928,125 864,916

623,260 Free goods.

1,273,878 366,153

834,343 Specie....

2,406,306 115,550

66,789 Total entered at the port .... $12,801,110 $9,730,791 $12,620,219

Withdrawn from warehouse.. . 1,117,262 1,669,304 1,254,358 To guard against misapprehension, we repeat our former explanation, that the specie received from California, up to November, 1850, was mostly cleared from Chagres on the Isthmus, and entered here as from a foreign port. The receipts of free goods have increased from last year nearly half a million of dollars, but are less than for the same month of 1850. The imports, exclusive of specie, were divided between dry goods and general merchandise as follows:

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN MERCHANDISE AT NEW YORK FOR SEPTEMBER.

Dry goods......
General merchandise..

1850.
$5,291,690
5,103,114

1851.
$5,106,054
4,509,187

1852. $6,659,318 5,894,112

Total merchandise......... $10,394,804 $9,615,241 $12,553,430 It will be seen from the foregoing that the total receipts of foreign merchandise for the month were $2,939,189 greater than for September, 1851, and $2,158,626 greater than for the same month of 1850. This increase has not been sufficient to compensate for the falling off noticed earlier in the year, and the total foreign imports, exclusive of specie, at New York since January 1st, are $7,921,337 less than for the same period of last year, and $535,946 less than for the first nine months of 1850, as will be seen from the following statement: IMPORTS OF FOREIGN MERCHANDISE AT NEW YORK FOR NINE MONTHS,

1860.
1861.

1852. Dry goods......

$53,509,498 $64,546,862 $49,533,493 General merchandise.

47,041,286 53,758,737 50,481,344

Total merchandise ..

$100,560,783

$108,306,599

$100,014,887

Had the receipts of general merchandise borne the same proportion to those of dry goods as in former years, the total for the current year would show a still greater decline. We annex further particulars of the foregoing imports, with the amount of specie from foreign ports :

IMPORTS ENTERED AT NEW YORK FROM FOREIGN PORTS FOR NINE MONTHS, ENDING

SEPTEMBER 30.
1850.
1851.

1852. Entered for consumption..... $80,481,533 $90,426,070 $83,305,277 Entered for warehousing.

12,587,769 10,709,917 6,539,890 Free goods

7,481,481 7,169,612 10,169,670 Specie...

14,928,519 1,782,529 2,151,954

Total entered at the port .. $115,479,302 $110,088,128 $102,166,791

Withdrawn from warehouse. 8,211,418 9,801,534 12,206,926 It will be noticed that the value of goods entered for warehousing is $4,000,000 less than during the same period of last year, and $6,000,000 less than for the same time in 1850; while the withdrawals from warehouse show a corresponding increase. This might have been expected from the brisk demand which had been maintained for foreign goods, which has taken all fresh arrivals, which were at all desirable, directly for consumption, and drawn largely on the surplus stock left in bond from former seasons. The imports have increased during the last quarter, so that in order to show the progress of the foreign trade since January 1st, we have compiled a quarterly statement which will be found of much interest.

(QUARTERLY STATEMENT OF IMPORTS ENTERED AT NEW YORK.

Entered for consumption....
Entered for warehousing..
Free goods...
Specie.....

March 31, 1852
$24,911,287

3,201,496
3,996,343

740,450

QUARTER ENDING
June 30, 1852.
$22,133,625

1,826,253
3,348,442
1,137,731

Sept 30, 1852. $36,260,365

1,512,141 2,824,885

273,773

Total, 1852..

$32,849,576 $28,446,051 $40,871,164 Total, 1851..

40,608,975 31,780,382 37,698,771 Total, 1850..

32,068,726 34,954,052 48,096,524 Withdrawn from warehouse '52. $4,979,498 $3,547,279 $3,680,149 Withdrawn from warehouse '51. 2,992,121 2,720,220 4,089,193 Withdrawn from warehouse '50. 2,326,776 2,113,199 3,777,444

We also annex our usual summary of the imports of dry goods, the totals of which are included in the above statement:

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER.

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Total entered at the port.... $5,291,690 $5,106,054 $6,659,318 IMPORT OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK FOR NINE MONTHS, ENDING SEPTEMBER 30.

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION.
1850.
1851.

1852. Manufactures of wool....

$13,527,083 $11,965,958 $12,079,080 Manufactures of cotton.

9,020,422 8,448,367 7,906,679 Manufactures of silk...

17,110,790 19,828,556 17,020,256 Manufactures of flax

6,270,651 5,161,925 4,781,272 Miscellaneous dry goods....

2,112,874 3,087,479 3,475,820 Total..

$48,041,820 848,492,285 $45,263,107 WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE,

1850.
1861.

1852. Manufactures of wool...

$1,538,567 $1,688,155 $1,467,303 Manufactures of cotton.

1,072,811 1,237,340 1,291,003 Manufactures of silk...

962,064 1,225,715 1,638,467 Manufactures of flax...

370,711 507,477 714,607 Miscellaneous dry goods

120,851 311,647 296,552 Total ....

$4,065,004 $4,970,334 $5,407.932 Add entered for consumption... 48,041,820 48,492,285 45,263,107

Total thrown on market..... $52,106,824 $53,462,619 $50,671,039

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING.
1850.
1851.

1852. Manufactures of wool.......

$1,903,973 $1,939,209 $1,098,877 Manufactures of cotton..

1,654,493 2,342,205 745,479 Manufactures of silk

1,208,605 1,794,381 1,812,847 Manufactures of flax

600,197 620,107 300,384 Miscellaneous dry goods.....

358,675 358,675 312,799 Total.....

$5,467,678 $6,054,577 $4,270,386 Add entered for consumption... 48,041,820 48,492,285 45,263,107

Total entered at port....... $53,509,498 $54,546,862 $49,533,493 By the above tables it will be seen that the total value of foreign dry goods received at the port of New York for the month, was $1,553,264 greater than for the same month of last year, and $1,367,628 greater than for the same

month of 1850. But the total receipts of foreign dry goods since January 1st are $5,013,369 less than for the same period of last year, and $3,976,005 less than for the same period of 1850.

The cash duties for the year are in excess of the government estimates, and the balance in all the depositories is quite large. The following will show the comparative revenue at the port of New York for the month, and for each quar. ter since January 1st:CASH DUTIES RECEIVED AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

1850.

1851.

1852. In September....

$2,495,242 77 $2,609,832 97 $3,156,107 29 Quarter ending March 31..... 6,996,656 48 9,295,257 30 7,617,887 72 Quarter ending June 30

6,033,253 57 7,357,408 30 6,632,425 16 Quarter ending September 30 10,190,324 37 9,402,997 30 10,281,190 03

Total for nine months ..... $23,220,234 42 $26,055,662 90 $24,531,502 91

The total revenue of the United States for customs, for the last quarter of the year, may be set down in round numbers as follows:From the district of New York.....

$10,215,000 From the district of Boston

1,888,000 From the district of Philadelphia..

1,397,000 From the district of New Orleans.

436,000 From the district of Baltimore..

211,000 From the district of Charleston..

141,000 From all other districts...

500,000

Total for three months, ending Sept. 30, 1852... $14,788,000

Total for three months, ending Sept. 30, 1851... 14,754,909 The current quarter of the year, will show a much larger gain in the revenue, and it will soon become a serious question as to what is to be done with the money.

Turning now to the exports from the same port, we find an increase for the month of $691,197, as compared with last year, although the shipments have not reached the amount which cleared during the same month of 1850. EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER.

1850.

1851.

1852. Domestic produce ...

$4,844,574 $2,593,986 $3,289,429 Foreign merchandise, free..

16,551 134,271

128,184 Foreign, dutiable

707,834 316,047

317,888 Specie....

1,033,918 3,490,142 2,122,495 Total ...

$6,602,877 $6,534,446 $5,857,996 Total, exclusive of specie...... 5,568,959 3,014,304 3,735,501 This increase for the month brings the exports for the year (exclusive of specie) up to just about the same value as for the corresponding period of last year, but leaves it about $2,000,000 behind the amount for the first nine months of 1850. EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR NINE MONTHS, ENDING SEPT. 30.

1850.
1851.

1852. Domestic produce

$32,273,100 $31,498,446 $30,741,612 Foreign merchandise, free..

479,850
530,901

716,626 Foreign, dutiable ..

3,778,199 2,916,735 3,294,178 Specie.....

6,447,466 31,261,271 20,653,836 Total.......

$42,978,615 $66,207,353 $55,406,247 Total, exclusive of specie .. 36,631,149 34,946,082 34,752,411 The exports of specie, it will be seen, are far behind the shipments of last year. We also annex a quarterly statement of the exports since January 1st:

QUARTERLY STATEMENT OF EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK.

Domestic produce
Foreign merchandise, free
Foreign, dutiable
Specie

March 31, 1852.
$10,085,484

221,182
1,037,746
7,032,495

QUARTER ENDING

June 30, 1852,
$12,060,837

300,037
1,381,829
5,591,514

Sept. 30 1852. $8,595,791

195,407 864,598 8,029,827

Pork........

Wheat....

Cut meats....

Total, 1852....

$18,376,907 $19,333,717 $17,685,623 Total, 1851.....

15,533,650 28,369,791 22,303,912 Total, 1850....

9,813,888 13,981,894 19,183,133 We also annex a comparative statement of the shipments of some of the leading articles of produce, from New York to foreign ports, from January 1st to October 16th:1851. 1852.

1851. 1852. Ashes-Pots ...bbls. 18,289 14,950 Naval stores....bbls. 299,538 354,646

Pearls..... 1,511 731 Oils—Whale... galls. 1,033,398 37,838 Beeswax..... ..lbs. 233,707 234,742 Sperm..

496,977 549,572 Breadstuffs

Lard

204,181 23,679 Wheat flour...bbls. 1,029,082 1,091,194 Linseed..

5,899 10,838 Rye flour

7,085 8,086 ProvisionsCorn meal. 33,638 38,237

...... bbls. 38,444 29,965 bush. 943,848 2,063,034

Beef

29,107 37,541 Rye....

236,460

. lbs. 2,823,905 1,357,262 Oats. 3,418 9,968 Butter...

1,818,092 541,317 Barley.

367 Cheese

4,638,967 784,108 Corn 1,438,893 735,324 Lard

4,679,702 3,879,669 Candles-Mould. bxs. 30,297

47,722 Rice..

tcs. 22,959 23,276 Sperm..... 2,583 3,141 | Tallow

lbs. 1,896,977 365,115 Coal...

tons

4.834 30,739 Tobacco-Crude pkgs. 13,686 20,841 Cotton. bales 248,560 293,370

Man'd. .lbs. 2,874,949 3,498,739 Hay

5,939 6,650 Whalebone....... lbs. 1,700,144 626,773 Hops.

189 499 This comparison exhibits some changes in our export trade worthy of notice. The exports of flour have increased only about 60,000 bbls., while the shipments of wheat have increased 1,119,186 bushels, or about 120 per cent on last year's exports! The shipments of corn have fallen off 700,000 bushels. The exports of whale oil, owing to its scarcity in consequence of the damage to the whaling fleet, have been comparatively nominal. Provisions have gone forward less freely, as a general thing, in consequence of their high prices, but beef has been more freely shipped. Tobacco has been taken in larger quantities. The prospects for the export trade are quite flattering, and an increased demand for prime grain and many other domestic products, may reasonably be expected. We gave in our last a complete statement of the shipments of cotton down to the close of the commercial year (August 31.) Since that date the exports have slightly increased as compared with last year. There can be but little question but what our previous estimate of the quantity of breadstuffs to be exported, will be fully realized. We have a large surplus of cereals, and at some price or other, they must be sold. The present price is not so great as to hinder a large consumption in Great Britain, and that country will doubtless continue to be our best customer.

The import trade must continue large down to the close of the year; the stocks of goods in first hands are quite small, and the demand is not yet satisfied. The receipts of foreign merchandise for the last quarter of 1851 were not heavy, and there is every prospect that the same period of this year will show a considerable excess in comparison. Should the exports prove as large as antici. pated-particularly should cotton go forward freely--no inconvenience will result from this increased business, while our marine will be fully employed at profitable rates.

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