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36.--Northwood; or, Life at the North and South. By Mrs. SARAH J. Hale. Ilus

trated. 12mo., pp. 999. New York: H. Long & Brother.

This work is written in that genuine spirit of Christian philanthropy which knows " no North and no South,” except as forming parts of one great and glorious Union, of which all the citizens, in every quarter, are brethren. It is marked by strong and excellent sense, is written in an animated and interesting style, and delineates with great fidelity and justness many of the striking traits both of Northern and Southern character. It does justice to the peculiar and embarrassing circumstances of the South, and sets forth many important principles, the practice of which would cement the Union, and foster the prosperity of all portions of the country. We are gratified, for the sake of the “good and gifted” author, to learn that there is a very extensive sale of this work. 37.The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans, with Biographical Sketches, Containing upwards of One Hundred and Twenty Engraved Portraits of the Most Eminent Persons in the History of the United States. 8vo. Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Philadelphia : R. Peterson. New York: Wm. Terry.

The portraits contained in these numbers are those of Gen. Washington and his wife Martha, Thomas Jefferson, John Hancock, Chas. Carroll, W. Irving, Wm. White, John Marshall, Gen. Scott, Gen. Anthony Wayne, and Commodore MacDonough. They are executed with much taste and skill, and generally the resemblance to the best paintings of the originals is very correct. The biographical sketches are general, yet embrace all the leading incidents in the lives of each individual. 38.—The Art Journal for September and October. New York and London : Geo.

Virtue.

This unrivaled organ of the fine arts is embellished in its usual admirable style, and rich in artistic intelligence. The plates in the September number are “Lady Gadiva,” from a picture in the Vernon Gallery; “Napoleon's Mother," from the statue by Canova ; and the “Infant Bacchus,” from a picture in the Vernon Gallery. In the October number the plates are “ The Tired Soldier,” and “ Cupid Bound,” from pictures in the Vernon Gallery; and the “Faithful Messenger," from the statue by Geefs at Antwerp—with numerous illustrations also of German art. 39.—The Waverley Novels. Library Edition. Vols. X. and XI. Boston: B. B.

Mussey.

These volumes embrace “Kenilworth” and “The Abbot." The illustrations on wood are in the highest style of the art, and altogether this is one of the most desirable editions of the Scott novels that bas yet been published. 40.- Waverley Novels. “ Black Dwarf” and “Old Mortality.” 8vo., pp. 124. Phila

delphia : A. Hart

This is the cheapest edition of the Waverley Novels at present published. The appearance, typography, &c., is quite fair. 41.The Old Engagement. A Spinster Story. By Julia Day. 12mo., pp. 215.

Boston: James Munroe & Co.

This is a simple narrative, the attraction of which must be chiefly sought for in the gracefulness and spirit with which it is related. 42.The University Speaker ; a Collection of Pieces Designed for College Exercises

in Recitation, with Suggestions on the Appropriate Elevation of Particular Passages. By William RUSSELL. 12mo., pp. 528. Boston: James Munroe & Co. The pieces in this volume consist of rhetorical, oratorical, and poetical extracts. They are selected with judgment and good taste, forming a book as meritorious as any of the kind. 43.-Philosophers and Actresses. By ARSENE HOUSSAYE. vols, 12mo., pp. 411 and

406. New York: J.S. Redfield.

These volumes should be regarded as a second part of the “ Men and Women of the Eighteenth Century”—a work by the same author, which has recently appeared. They are written with the same taste and interesting style of narrative. Intermingled with the lives are prominent events of an influential kind, which were remarkable in the career of individnals. The volumes contain sketches of Voltaire, Mademoiselle Gaussin, Callat, Tardiff, Chamfort, Madame Parabere, Prudhon, and very many others.

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CONTENTS OF NO. VI., VOL. XXVII.

ARTICLES. ART.

PAO!. I, DEBT3 AND FINANCES OF THE STATES OF THE UNION.-WITH REFERENCE

TO THEIR GENERAL CONDITION AND PROSPERITY.-CHAPTER 1X.—THE WEST-
ERN STATES-ILLINOIS. By Tuomas P. KETTELL, of New York.....

659 II. SUGAR: AND THE SUGAR TRADE...

671 III. COMMERCIAL CITIES AND TOWNS OF THE UNITED STATES.--No. XXXI.NEW YORK.- PART IV. By E, HALE, Jr., of New York.....

686 IV, MERCANTILE BIOGRAPHY.-JAMBETJEE JEEJEEBHOY-A PARSEE MERCHANT 694 V. TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MOBILE, 1851-52...

703

JOURNAL OF MERCANTILE LAW. Under what circumstances a foreign minister can suo and be sued in the United States......... 710

COMMERCIAL CHRONICLE AND REVIEW: EMBRACING A FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL REVIEW OF THE UNITED STATES, ETC., ILLUSTRA

TED WITH TABLES, ETO., AS FOLLOWS: General commercial prosperity-Distinction between the spirit of enterprise and speculation

The danger of a thirst for sudden riches--Banks ar bankers-Increase of new banks-Domestic trade and interior collections-Prices of stocks and bonds-Deposils and coinage af ide Philadelphia and New Orleans Mints for October-Ditto at all the Mints since January 1st - Production of Calfornia goli, and export to Great Britain-Imports of foreign merchandise at New York for October and from January 1st-Classification of imports, with the receipts of foreign dry goods-Revenue of the country-Cash receipts at the port of New York-Ex. ports from New York for October, and from June 1st-Shipments of leading articles of produce-Diversion of shipping to Australia, and consequent advance in rates of freight., . 713-720 VOL. XXVII.NO. VI.

42

... 739

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

PAOL. Production and consumption of colton..

721 Export of leather, bools, and shoes from the United States...

729 Virginia Tobacco Irade, 1851-52.

723 Advance in the price of sperm and whale oils..

723 The butter trade of Cincinnati....

724 Prices of tobacco in New Orleans..

725 The pork trade of Cincinnati...

726 Agricultural statistics of the United States..................

728 The trade and revenue of Ireland.

729 Receipts of produce by the new canal at New Orleans......................

730 Bhipments of brandy from Charente to Great Britain................

730 COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS. Postal treaty between the United States and Prussia..

731 Bignals for ships ordered by Sweden...

732 Tribunals of Commerce....

732 Method of putting up produce for market...

733 Bhip building in Louisiana.-of ocean postage..

735 The passengers' act of the United Kingdom. – Reduction of export duty at Turk's Island.......

736 JOURNAL OP BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE, Capital and dividends of New York city banks..

737 Production of Precious metals in the world

738 Progress of the British penny postage system.. Receipts and expenditures of the United States..

740 United States treasurer's statement, October 25, 1852..

741 Banks under the general banking law of Illinois.-Gold and silver in the Bank of England ..... 749 British post office system of remitting money.-Shipments of gold dust from San Francisco..... 743 Weighing department of the Bank of England

744 NAUTICAL INTELLIGENCE. The American Nautical Almanac...

744 of entering the channel of the Bay of Smyrna.-or the light on the Island of Seiro........... 745 South Foreland High Light.—Directions for sailing into and out of Harbor Grace..

746 West Coast of Jutland, and the Coasts of Bornholm.-Detention of vessels at Hampton Roads.. 746

JOURNAL OF MINING AND MANUFACTURES. The arst mining operations in North America..

747 The manufacture of glass.-No. iv. By DRMING JARVIS, Esq., of Massachusetts. Industrial progress of Georgia..

749

751 Statistical account of tanneries in the United States, compared with the returns of 1850. Manufacture of ladies' muffs in London.-Items of gold mining in California...

752 Progress of British cotton manufactories........

753

753 Production of Indigo in South Carolina...

734 RAILROAD, CANAL, AND STEAMBOAT STATISTICS. Florence and Keyport plank road..

754 Cost and expenses of seven railroads of Massachusetts for the years 1850 and 1851.

756 Statistics or Massachusetts Railroads..... Rates of freight on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad

757 Infuence of railroads on Agriculture

758

759 Persons employed on railways in England.

760 Key West as a depot for California steamers....

761 STATISTICS OF POPULATION. Emigration from the United Kingdom...

763 Population and territory of the Austrian empire in 1851.

......... 764 MERCANTILE MISCELLANIES. "Naval dry-docks of the United States.". Mercantile Library....

766

767 or the tax or duty on foreign coal.. Talleyrand and the banker

767 Invention for Negro clothing

768 The banker's Saturday nigbi..

768 An eye to business.....,

769 A creditor's stratagem to collect a debt.

769 No antagonism between capital and labor...................

769

770 American trade in India

770 TIE BOOI TRADE. Notices of new books, or new editions......

771-776

HUNT'S

MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE

AND

COMMERCIAL REVIEW.

DECEMBER, 1852.

Art. 1.-DEBTS AND FINANCES OF THE STATES OF THE UNION.

WITH REFERENCE TO THEIR GENERAL CONDITION AND PROSPERITY.

CHAPTER IX.

The Western States-Illinois.

Among all the States of the Union which succumbed to the financial storm of 1836–40, none had more canvas spread, or so little ballast, as that gem of the West, Illinois; nevertheless, none has more promptly recovered its position, or more satisfactorily responded to the hopes of its friends, or the wishes of its creditors. The locality of Illinois is highly favorable for the development of its great natural resources, under the influence of mod. ern improvements. The north-eastern extremity borders Lake Michigan.

• The first of this series of papers was published in the Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review for November, 1847, (vol. xvii., page 406.) That article, an introduction to the series, related chiefly to the State debts of Europe and of the United States. It was followed in the number for December, 1847, (vol. xvii., page 577,) by an article on the New England States, embracing Maine and Massachusetts; and in March, 1848, (vol. xviii., page 243,) by New York; in March, 1849, (vol. xx., page 256,) by Pennsylvania; in May, 1849, (vol. xx., page 481,) by Maryland ; in August, 1849, (vol. xxi., page 148,) by Indiana; in October, 1849, (vol. xxi., page 389,) by Ohio; and in the number for February, 1850, (vol. xxii., page 131,) by an article on Michigan. The series, it will be seen by reference to the preceding chapters, with the exception of the first, published in November, 1847, have all appeared under the same general title prefixed to the present chapter. The articles contain the most comprehensive and reliable account of the debts, finances, and resources of the several States, that have ever been grouped in a connected and convenient form for reference -present and future.

The Wabash and the Ohio Rivers border it on the east and south, meeting there the Mississippi, which is its western boundary. The length of the State is 380 miles, north and south, The northern breadth is 140 nuiles expanding to 200 miles in the center, and terminating in a point at the south, thus forming the figure of a purse, which may be taken as an emblem of its destiny. The circuit of the State is 1,210 miles, of which 70 miles is lake coast, 550 miles the channel of the Mississippi, 140 miles the the Obio, and 150 miles the channel of the Wabash, leaving 300 miles, or about one-fourth, for land lines. The surface of the State is remarkable. About two-thirds consists of prairies, that are numerous and extensive in the center and north. In the southern part the country is more broken, but nowhere are the elevations 200 feet above the general level. The prairies form wide expanses, stretching as far as the eye

can reach, interspersed only occasionally by belts of wood land, following the streams. The surface is of such a dead level as to afford no water shed, and the fallen rains pass off by evaporation. There is much fine timber in Mlinois, but it is confined to certain sections.

Illinois was very early settled by the French on the rich bottom, extending from the mouth of the Kaskaskia 90 miles northerly to the bluffs of Alton, having St. Louis on the opposite bank of the Mississippi. The soil is there 25 feet deep, and it has been said that land, planted annually for 200 years with wheat without dressing, is as fertile now as ever. In our article for August, 1849, upon the State of Indiana, we described the “ North-West Territory " and its political progress, including Illinois. The disposition that has been made of the lands of Illinois, with the population of the State, is as follows:

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The following table shows the quantity of land sold in the State annually, with the population at different times :

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