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COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING THE COST AND EXPENSES OF SEVEN RAILROADS OF MASSACHUSETTS FOR THE YEARS 1850 AND 1851.

COMPILED EXPRESSLY FOR TOE MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE BY GEORGE A. HAMILTON, ESQ.

Cost of bulld-Cost of build- Cost of Cost of Cost of Cost of

mile of single mile of single ings per mile ings per mile equip. per equip. per fuel per fuel per Total cost. Total cost.

of track. of track, m. of track. m. of track. mile run. mile run.
$4,882,648 23 $4,862,748 00 $38,598 00 $38,440 70 $5,966 06 $5,991 26 $4,230 98 $4,180 38 18,340 17,161
4,021,606 69 4,090,452 48 31,418 80 31,708 98 3,688 56 3,933 48 2,375 76 2,582 98 12,173 14,203
9,963,708 84 9,953,758 84 47,447 66 47,398 85 1,700 46 1,700 46 4,393 27 4,364 70 16,045 16,284
1,945,646 68 1,945,646 68 36,710 31 36,710 31 14,228 31 14,228 31 3,308 40 3,308 40 15,960 19,062
3,416,232 51 3,469,599 38 45,549 76 46,261 32

6,041 60

2,224 73 17,504 17,838
1,798,825 13 1,801,592 36 34,592 79 34,646 00 2,101 61 2,195 84 3,606 85 3.606 89 10,339 10,846
3,552,282 59 3,612,486 97 27,537 07 28,003 77 3,186 11 3,381 88 3,277 05 3,328 09 14,331 16,215

Freight Freight Passenger Passenger Repairs Repairs
Cost of oil Cost of oil General ex General ex- department department department department of engines of eng's

per mile
per mile

per mile per mile mile run.

2,085 4,688 5,279 43,777 37,841 17,856 15,906 8,547 9,145 1,637

1,686 2,696 2,412 35,770 33,932 13,364 13,908 5,142 4,650 2,209 2,148 3,272 3,599

t

+ 6,139 5,545
955

1,054 6,919 8,719 60,584 62,474 14,460 13,032 10,892 11,289
1,309
1,119 3,703 2,738 33,216

27,982 14,018 14,760 3,988 4,461 1,451

33,649 38,914 17,635 14,649 6,143 8,850 1,678 1,533 3,131

41,268 40,582 12,339 14,831 4,016 4,943

per mile

per mile

run.

run.

run.

run,

run.

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Cost per

Cost per

Names of roads.
Boston and Worcester..
Boston and Maine.
Western.
Boston and Lowell.
Boston and Providence..
Connecticut River.
Fitchburg

1850. 1851.

track. track.

per mile penses per penses per

mile run. 2,484

1,343 4,892 3,265

2,316

per mile

run.

run.

run.

Boston and Worcester..
Boston and Maine.

Western.......

Boston and Lowell..
Boston and Providence..
Connecticut River.
Fitchburg.

per mile

Repairs of Repairs of Repairs of Repairs of Repairs
passenger cars passenger cars freight cars freight cars of road
per mile
per mile per mile

per mile

per mile
run.

run
run.
run.

run.
Boston and Worcester..

3,408

5,042 12,139 11,151 12,843 Boston and Maine..

4,601

3,059 5,956 4,764 10,487 Western.

6,784

6,370 11,059 11,498 8,107 Boston and Lowell........

8,655

8,108 9,315 6,846 10,568 Boston and Providence....

2,454

3,718 5,299 3,353 7,375 Connecticut River.

4,904

4,507 8,316 9,885 8,405 Fitchburg

2,687 6,004 7,791

8,332 6,242 • These items are combined under one hend, thereforo no division can be made.

Repairs

P. ct. of P. ct. of
of road Whole cost Whole cost earnings earn'gs
per mile

per mile for for
run.
run.

run.

expenses, expen's. 8,017 91,320 88,765 62.5 55.6 11,805 61,776 66,053 48.6 48.2

4,574 79,030 77,169 44.3 44.2
11,153 109,275 106,973 63.4 65 6

9,094 64,270 70,287 43.6 47.1
10,506 89,714 73,611 71.4

67.6
8,892 68,478 83,467 46.6 60.1

+ Ditto.

Names of roads.
Boston and Worcester...
Boston and Maine
Western...
Boston and Lowell
Boston and Providence..
Connecticut River..
Fitchburg ...

1860. 1851. Receipts of Receipts of Receipts of Receipts of passenger passenger freight freight trains per irains per trains per

trains per mile run,

mile run. mile run. mile run. $1 42 $1 41 $? 27 $1 91 1 13 1 19 2 44 2 19 2 80 2 23 1 65 1 56 1 17 1 08 3 30 3 21 1 22

1 28 2 08 1 94 1 05 0 99 1 94 2 17

099 0 98 2 62 2 14 Average No. Average No. Average No. Average No. passengers passengers tons Treight tons freight per train, per train. per train,

per train. 74 74 66

64 67 69 68

63
86
83
66

61
64
65

88
44
60
36

81
34
33
40

41
66
68

77

Boston and Worcester......
Boston and Maine
Western.....
Boston and Lowell
Boston and Providence..
Connecticut River....
Fitchburg

87

61

STATISTICS OF MASSACHUSETTS RAILROADS.

We give below tabular statements of the operations of four railroads in Massachusetts, (the Eastern, the Boston and Maine, Boston and Lowell, and Taunton Branch.) These tatles show the cost, value of stock, gross receipts, running expenses, net income, and dividends of each railroad for the last ten years. In the Merchants' Magazine for August, 1852, (vol. xxvii., page 252,) we published a similar statement of the Boston and Worcester Railroad, and in September, (same year and volume, page 379,) a similar one of the Western (Massachusetts) Railroad :

EASTERN Railroad. Incorporated in 1836. Opened throughout November 9, 1840. Length, 74 miles, * including branches. Length of double track, 16 miles. Cost, Jandary 1, 1852, $3,614,725.

Value of
stock per
Gross Running

Net Div.
Years.
Cost. sbare. receipts. expenses. income.

p.C. 1842..

$100 $269,169 $119,040 $150,129 6 1843.

89 279,562 104,641 174,921 1844.

$2,388,600 1041 337,238 109,319 227,919 73 2,406,400 112 350,150 116,840 233,310

2,471,600 104 371,339 132,556 238,783 8 1847

2,815,100 108 424.841 135,083 289,758 8 1848.

2,937,200 104 479,158 182,216 296,942 8 1849

3,095,400 104 617,929 183,980 333,949 1850.

3,119,300 101 539,076 185,218 353,858 1851....

3,120,400 1044 602,054 195,399 306,655 8

1845. 1846.

Total......

$4,070,516 $2,464,292 $2,606,224 7 11-20 Boston AND MAINE RAILROAD. Incorporated in 1833. Incorporated originally as the Andover and Wilmington Railroad. In 1887, the road was extended to Haverhill, and in 1839 to New Hampshire State line. In 1841, it was united with the Boston and Maine Railroad, in New Hampshire, and the whole line was then called “The Boston and Maine Railroad.” Opened through in 1843. Length, including branches, 83 miles. Length of double track, 29 miles. Cost, January 1, 1852, $4,099,400.

• Including the Eastern Railroad in New Hampshire, which is leased to, and operated by, the Massachusetts Company.

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Total...

$3,977,452 $1,918,111 $2,059,341 ay. 63 Boston and Lowell RAILBOAD. Incorporated in 1830. Opened throughout, Jude, 1835. Length, 26 miles. Length of double track, 26 miles. Cost, January 1, 1852, $1,915,600.

Value of

stock per

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share. $595 695 640 580 575 572 650 550 556 570

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Total.......

stuck per

1842.....

$3,754,659 $2,088,854 $1,665,805 av. 8 Taunton Branco RAILROAD. Incorporated in 1835. Opened in 1836. Length, 11 miles, single track. Cost, January 1, 1852, $307,100.

Value of
Gross Running

Net Dir.
Years.
Cost. shure. receipts. expenses.

income.

p. C. $250,000 $112 $77,170 $51,850 $22,320

8 1843.

12 74,251 50,866 23,285 1844.

125 96,687 69,328 27,359 8 1845.

118 116.537 81,504 35,033 8 1846.

123,067 90,903 32,164 8 1847.

293,400

113,910 83,695 28,215 1818.

303.700 113 108,101 89,142 18,959 1849

305,100 112 108,398 84,979 23,419 1850.

306,400 110 114,466 86,908 27,558
807,100 111 131,293 104,291 27,002

iii

1851......

Total...

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RATES OF FREIGHT ON THE VIRGINIA AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD. ARTICLES APPROPRIATE TO THE FIrst Class. Boxes of hats, bonnets, and furniture,

ARTICLES APPROPRIATE TO TUE Second Class. Boxes, bales of dry goods, feathers. shoes, saddlery, glass, paints, oils, drugs and confectionery:

ARTICLES APPROPRIATE TO TOE Third Class. Virginia domestics, sugar, coffee, liquor, bagging, rope, butter, cheese, manufactured tobacco, leather, hides, cotton yarns, copper, tin, sheet irup, hollow-ware, queens-ware, castings, hardware, marble, (dressed,) and other heavy articles not enumerated io special or fourth class rates.

ArticLES APPROPRIATE TO THE Fourth Class. Flour, (in sacks,) rice, pork, beef,

• A re.valuation of the property of the road caused the diference between this amount and the cost in 1849.

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fish, lard, tallow and bacon, (in casks, boxes or sacka,) beeswax, bales of rags, ginseng and dried fruit, bar iron, marble, (undressed) mill and grind stunes, mill gearing. PLASTER PER TON OF 2,000 LBS.

SALT PER BUSIEL OF 50 POUNDS. 60 miles.. $1 00

8 100 miles.. 2 00

10

Carried East.....
150 miles..
2 60

11 200 miles..

3 00

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wac Third class per 100 lbs..........

Second class per 100 lbs........

BETWEEN
LYNCHBURG

AND

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COES Tobacco In hogsheads per 100 lbs. O

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Forest Depot.. 10
Liberty..... 26
Buforj's..

39
Bonsack's... 49
Big Lick

64
Salem.

60
Christiansburg. 86
Newbern 106
Wytheville. 135
Marion

163
Abingdon...... 190
State Line..... 205

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10 12 15 20 20 20 25 30 35 37 40 45

10 20 25 35 35 35 37 40 45 48 62 55

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8} 10 11 12 13 14 15

1 50 2 00 7 1 75 3 00 11 2 00 3 50 14 2 50 4 00 18 2 50 4 00 18 2 50 4 00 18 3 00 4 50 24 3 50 550 30 4 ou 6 50 32 4 50 7 00 35 5 00 8 00 38 5 50 900 40

9 10 11 12 13

INFLUENCE OF RAILROADS ON AGRICULTURE.

A Boston cotemporary has some just remarks on the influence of railroads on the agriculture of New Eogland, as follows :

It is doubtless within the recollection of many that when our system of railroads was started there was a general opposition to it among the farmers, especially in the New England States, lest their interest should be thereby seriously damaged. It was feared that this new medium of transportation would glut our markets with We-tern produce, and reduce the price of all agricultural products, so as to put it out of our power to compete with the more fertile regions of the West.

But those fears have not been realized. There has been no such falling off in the prices of produce as to make farming a less profitable business than it has heretofore been. The demand for such articles as we raise has kept pace with the supply, and the average of prices has, as we believe, been fully equal, for a series of years, to that which was obtained for a similar series previous to the construction of railroads. The truth is, that the expenses of transportation tend to equalize prices, and that in this respect the farnier near to a good market, even if his land and labor be dear, has a compensating advantage over farmers at a distance, where the cost of production is low,

In the great staples of agriculture, it is doubtless true that we cannot, here in New England, produce a surplus for exportation. Nor is it desirable, so long as we have a larger population at home than as yet we can begin to supply. Our home market exhausts all, and more than all that we can produce. And if the prices of any of our productions should, from the abundant supplies brought from other States, decline to a low point, we must adapt ourselves to circumstances, and turn our hands to the raising of such articles as will pay a profit. This, indeed, has already been begud. Fruit and poultry were never raised in larger quantities in New England than at present, while in parts, at least, beef, pork, and grain, have fallen off. This is the part of

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wisdom, and our farmers should be on the alert to give greater attention to the pro duction of articles in which he will meet with the least competition.

We remember very distinctly when the project of the Western Railroad was first broached, and its claims were urged by ove of its warmest advocates, P. P. F. Degrand, at one of the farmers' meetings at the State House. He was met with the ob jection that it would ruin the farmers on the seaboard—they could not compete with the West in raising the great staples of agriculture, and what shall they do with their farms ? “Turn them," said the shrewd old gentleman, “into strawberry fields; that will make them pay!" The reply seemed almost to be the words of irony instead of soberness; and yet the day is at band when there will be found to be more truth than poetry in it. In the neighborhood of our cities and large towns, the cultivation of the smaller fruits is largely and profitably carried on. And this species of garden culture is extending into the interior, along the line of our railroads, and is destined to become more and more extensively prosecuted. The hills of New England have not yet be come barren: orchards and vines may be grown upon them yet, with ample returne, even if they should no longer profitably yield the same products as in the days of our forefathers.

But of some of our staple products, railroads have by no means lessened the price. Milk, butter, and cheese, have continued to command about the same rates as hereto fore. Hay, good English hay, the price of which in the market, it was thought, would be seriously affected by the substitution of the iron horse for the animal horse, still keeps up at a remunerating point, and is more largely raised in New England than ever. The fact is found to be, that the animal borse did not go out of use quite as fast as it was prophesied he would. He was only removed from the old stage-coach to be harnessed to the omnibus and the express-wagon; and he now requires an equal quantity of hay to keep bim going as he did in his former occupation. There are probably more horses to day in Massachusetts than at any previous period in her history, and the demand for good horses never was greater, nor the prices paid for them higher.

Horses—the good old fashioned horse of flesh and blood, bone and sinew-are by po means extinct among us. The iron horse has proved bimself to be only a breeder of other horses. The farmer who feared that Dobbin's days were numbered—bis glory departed—when the steam-pipe sent its shrill whistle into his heart, now plucks up courage, and sets a higher value than ever on his sure.footed beast. Neither is the farmer bimself gone into retirement, since the air.line railroad cut its way through his farm--we rather think he has made them pay a consideration for the land they took from him-he is now at work on the acres that remain harder than ever; and by pro per cultivation, proper selection of seeds, better adaptation of crops, and closer altention to the wants of the consumer, he finds himself still alive and flourishing-botwithstanding his fears that the railcars, when they first whished by, would take the very breath out of his body.

PERSONS, EMPLOYED ON RAILWAYS IN ENGLAND. It appears from a parliamentary return recently issued, that the number of persons employed on railways in the United Kingdom on the 30th of June, 1851, was 106,501, and on 30th of June, 1850, 118,859 ; showing a decrease of 12,358 persons, including 10,667 laborers. The number employed on railways in England and Wales on the 30th June, 1851, was...

80.619 In Scotland

8.802 In Ireland ...

17.087 In June, 1850, the numbers were, in England and Wales.

78,570 In Scotland

16,495 In Ireland

23,794 The number of miles open at the end of June, 1851, was.

6,6988 In course of construction....

735 The length open at the end of June, 1850, was.....

6,3074 In course of construction.....

8681 The number of miles in abeyance at the end of June, 1851, was.

4,5254 The total length authorized at that date was

11,959

.. miles

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