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1852.
1851.

1850.
Entered Withdwn from Entered Withd'wn from Entered Withd’n from

Warehouse warebouse. warehouse. warehouse. warehouse, warehouse. January.. $1,281,694 $1,684,652 $1,611,847 $1,024,246 $950,753 $902,965 February.. 1,003,383 1,788,997 1,240,329 899,438 717,662 856,167 March

916,519 1,605,849 1,181,925 1,068,437 1,013,485 561,653 April...

732,422 1,255,429 1,238,313 1,144,068 1,498,293 586,260 May

463,109 1,380,371 2,148,428 858,619 2,344,780 742,914 Total....... 4,387,027 7,616,298 6,420,842 4,994,708 6,524,973 3,649,949

This shows the withdrawals for the first five months of the current year to be $3,500,000 in excess of the entries, which would leave the stock very small, as will be seen by the following calculation of the business since the 1st of January, 1850:

WAREHOUSE AT NEW YORK.

Entered warehouse. Withdrawn. For the year 1850

$15,099,750 $10,922,946 For the year 1851..

13,903,152

13,898,526 Bive months of 1862.

4,387,027

7,615,298

Total .......

$33,389,929 $32,436,770 The stock in warehouse on the 1st of April, which commenced the current quarter, amounted to only $6,199,630, including breadstuffs in bond.

The falling off in the imports for May, as noticed above, added to the deficit for the four months previously given, leaves the total imports at New York since January 1st, nearly $11,000,000 behind the amount for the same period of the previous year, and about $7,000,000 less than the corresponding amount for 1850, as will be seen by the following comparison :TOTAL IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FROM FOREIGN PORTS FOR FIVE MONTAS, ENDING MAY 31st. Entered direct. Ent'd wareh'se. Free goods.

Specie. 1852

$39,418,731 $4,387,027 $6,281,838 $1,448,434 $51,636,030 1851

50,290,562 6,420,842 4,468,928 1,278,099 62,458,431 1860

41,217,862 6,524,973 4,946,991 5,902,099 68,591,925 Of this decline from last year, $4,353,368 consists of dry goods, of which $504,349 has been realized since the first of May, as will be seen by the following comparison:

Total.

IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK DURING THE MONTH OF BAY.

1852, $397,305 277,351 518,368 263,607 246,796

$1,763,427

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION.

1850.

1851. Manufactures of wool....

$768,810 $586,360 Manufactures of cotton

556,829 237,349 Manufactures of silk

1,030,895

918,399 Manufactures of flax

867,677 268,986 Miscellaneous dry goods

52,528 124,013 Total ..

$2,776,739 $2,135,097 WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE.

1850.

1851. Manufactures of wool....

$28,095 $76,800 Manufactures of cotton...

40,507

62,646 Manufactures of silk.....

46,720

49,343 Manufactures of flax

37,506

28,980 Miscellaneous dry goods

6,083

28,616 Total ......

$158,911 $236,384 Add entered for consumption... 2,776,739 2,135,097

1852. $70,584

37,902 138,717 40,355 26,706

$314,263 1,703,427

Total thrown upon market...

$2,935,650

$2,371,481

$2,017,690

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IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS AT TØR PORT OF NEW YORK FOR FIVE MONTHS, ENDING YAY 28.

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WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE.

1850.
1851.

1852. Manufactures of wool...

$346,837 $474,386 $779,610 Manufactures of cotton..

608,095 822,057 1,004,230 Manufactures of silk..

514,153 620,655 1,163,650 Manufactures of flax .....

202,023 332,322 566,149 Miscellaneous dry goods

76,215 220,667 219,324 Total.......

$1,746,323 $2,370,087 $3,732,968 Add entered for consumption.

23,447,713 26,199,139 21,542,604 Total thrown upon the market. $25,194,036 $28,569,226 $26,275,667

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING.

1850.
1851.

1852. Manufactures of wool..

$587,385 $589,058 $683,436 Manufactures of cotton

825,023 763,854 536,078 Manufactures of silk ..

496,309 861,037 1,434,510 Manufactures of flax..

321,539 822,561 187,772 Miscellaneous dry goods

60,529 190,080 187,967 Total .....

$2,280,785 $2,726,690 $3,029,767 Add entered for consumption...

23,447,713 26,199,139 21,642,604 Total entered at the port .. $25,728,498 $28,925,729 $24,572,361 The receipts for duties also exhibit a decline from last year:

RECEIPTS FOR DUTIES AT NEW YORK.
1852.

1851.

1850. $1,952,110 86 $2,504,640 16 2,311,900 68 Previously reported.... 10,065,521 79 11,842,839 82

9,213,325 61 Total since January 1....

$12,017,632 65 $14,347,479 98 $11,625,226 29 Notwithstanding the decrease in the imports, the exports from this country to foreign ports, will compare favorably with the shipments for the corresponding period of any former year.

The following will show the clearances from the port of New York:

For the month of May

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1851.

.......bbls.

EXPORTS FRON NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR MAY.
Domestic produce. For'n dutiable. For'n free. Specie.

Total. 1862

$4,249,924 $546,973 $106,818 $1,834,893 $6,737,608 1851

4,402,052 361,015 113,371 4,506,135 9,382,573 1850

3,610,977 310,231 36,401 741,735 4,699,344 In the above it will be seen that the shipments of specie show a large decrease, while the amount of merchandise is about the same. The following is a comparison for five months :EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR FIVE MONTHS, ENDING MAY 31st. Domestic produce. For'n dutiable. For'n free. Specie.

Total. 1852..

$18,579,452 $1,936,981 $395,719 $9,067,654 $29,979,806

18,678,580 1,716,452 814,910 12,631,148 33,341,060 1850.

14,945,666 1,555,414 375,083 1,573,290 18,449,461 We continue our monthly statement of the comparative exports of some of the leading articles of produce from New York to foreign ports, from January 1st to June 21st. 1851. 1852

1861. 1852. Ashes-Pots ....bbls. 10,418 6,794 Naval stores....bbls. 167,990 199,590

Pearls...... 1,007 315 OilsBeeswax.........lbs. 169,740 123,596 Whale

..galls. 704,538 26,722 Breadstuffs

Sperm.

236,577 243,541 Wheat flour ..bbls. 324,418 525,527 Lard...

178,218 18,075 Rye flour 4,385 6,683 Linseed.

3,137 7,084 Corn meal.

20,276 23,731 | ProvisionsWheat ...... bush. 215,788 666,873 Pork.......

24,698 18,307 Rye.... 234,996 Beef..

15,182 24,314 Oats ..

2,001 3,630

Cut meats. .Ibs. 2,602,344 1,056,498
Barley.

347
Butter.

1,450,945 295,366
Corn
943,370 521,160

Cheese...

2,537,163 895,288 Candles-Mould, bxs. 22,035 30,382 Lard..

2,789,601 1,140,964 Sperm..... 1,285 1,604 Rice .... .tcs. 16,950 20,453 Coal..

.tons. 3,043 16,372 Tallow...... .. lbs. 1,210,560 259,537 Cotton. ...bales. 193,848 247,434 Tobacco-crude pkgs. 9,989 11,725 Hay. 2,541 5,691

manu'd. lbs. 1,843,925 1,754,496 Hops.

113 452 Whalebone..... 728,727 204,598 This table exhibits many items of much interest. It will be seen that the exports of wheat, rye, flour, cotton, naval stores, and beef have largely increased, while our shipments of Indian corn, oils, cut meats, butter, cheese, lard, tallow and whalebone have largely declined. The increase in rye is owing to the de. mand for the continent, whither over 200,000 bushels have been sent within the fast three months. Cotton has of course gone forward more freely owing to a larger crop here, and increased production abroad. The shipments of corn have declined, this article not suiting the foreign taste as well as wheat. Oils have been high and scarce, but are now going forward more freely under recent or. ders. Beef is more in demand, and if our countrymen could be persuaded to take the proper pains to prepare it for a foreign market, would soon become one of our most profitable articles of export.

There will be a large amount of money disbursed for dividends and interest on the 1st of July, which will tend to keep down the rates of interest in our larger Eastern cities to 4 a 54 per cent; while the large amount of railroad bonds and the like securities sold, and the money received for cereals and cotton, will make capital more abundant throughout the interior.

JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE.

FLUCTUATIONS OF STOCKS IN THE BOSTON MARKET,
In the Merchants' Magazine for June, 1852, (vol. xxvi., page 727,) we gave a table of
the Auctuations of forty different stocks in the Boston market, showing their highest and
lowest points, and the date, with the market value, gain or loss for the month of April,
1852, &c., derived from the carefully prepared “money article” of the Boston Com.
monwealth. We now subjoin, from the same reliable source, a similar table for the
month of May, 1852. This table shows the unusual feature of every stock having ad-
vanced or held its own, with the exception of the Vermont Central. The advance in
dividend securities has been very large.
FLUCTUATIONS FOR MAT IN FORTY DIFFERENT STOCKS, SHOWING THEIR HIGHEST AND

LOWEST POINTS, AND THE DATE, WITH THE PRESENT MARKET VALUE, GAIN OR LOSS FOR
THE MONTH, AND NUMBER OF SHARES SOLD IN EACH.

Value From
Stocks.

Highest Day Lowest Day May April 30. Shares
sales. mo. sales. mo, 31. Gain. Loss.

sold.
Boston and Lowell. .....
1094 24 1071 1 110 24

22 Boston and Providence..

941 22
90 1 934 37

558
Boston and Worcester.
1064 18 1027 1 1064 44

476 Boston and Maine.... 110 28 1054 1 110

202 Michigan Central....

101 13
99+ 1 1004 &

666
Manchester and Lawrence
1005 26 944 1 100 6

209 Vermont and Canada 104 27 100 10 104 4

208 Fitchburg 107} 27 1034 1 107 31

438 Eastern

1034 24
964 3 1037 67

187
Western
108 18 105 5 1074 34

500 Northern 681 6 681 31 634

1,044 Concord.

541 28
52 6 644 24

181 Concord and Montgomery.

47 24
421 17
454 34

401
Cheshire, (old stock)
45 3 45 3 45

1 Cheshire, (preferred).. 65 27 60 7 65

143 Old Colony 66 22 631 3 651 37

75 Rutland... 38 26 347 6 3875

137 South Shore..

98 13 9} 15

98

259 205 1 20 20 204

396 Reading, (par 50).

394 4 381 11

39} +

811 Wilmington, (par 60).

333 18

311 324 14 1,472
Norfolk
County

301
284 1 30

11

704 Ogdensburg.. 294 19 26 1 29

4,703 Vermont Central..... 195 3 163 8 171

39,068 Vermont and Massachusetts..

24
20 1

2,482
Pittsburg Copper Co...
107 17 107 17 108

7 Edgeworth Co. 8} 6 8 4 8

2,663 East Boston Co.

254 19

227 1 24 15 10,859 Canton Co.. 84 18 801 26 81

1,102 Essex Co..

1187 26 105

1 115 101 1,260 Bank of Commerce.. 1044 26 1036 1 1049 1

241 Bank of North America.. 105 21 1037 3 1044 14

32 Faneuil Hall Bank.

104 27 1037 10 104

15

89 Exchange Bank 1087 24 1064 108 1

82 Traders' Bank....

1051 21

none Ogdensburg 7's.

100 ii 98 4 100 44 $39,800 Vermont Central 7's

91 2

874
8 90%

$254,800 Do. 6's, 1856.

761
4 73 16 76

$11,500 Rotland 7's...

994 26

95 3 997 6 $61,800 Norfolk County Bonds...........

77 12 711 754 43 $17,100

Sullivan .....

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It will be seen, by referring to the table in the June number of the Merchants' Magazine, that the amount of business in the fancies has not been so large as in the month of April, transactions being more confined to dividend-paying securities, which have been in active request, more particularly about the middle of the month. Northern now (June 1) sells, dividend off, at half a dollar per share less than on the 30th of April, but including the dividend, the actual gain for the month has been $2 per share. Essex Company has been very active throughout the month ; May 1st it sold for 105, but reached 117 on the 7th, and then fell off to 108 May 13th. Again it started up, and touched 118 on the 19th, since which time it has been moving about between 116 and 118, sometimes varying $2 to $3 in one day.

OF THE INCREASED AND INCREASING SUPPLIES OF GOLD. The following article on the increased supplies of gold from California and Australia, is condensed from a late number of the London Athenæum. Although many of the “facts and figures” it contains have already appeared in former numbers of the Merchants' Magazine, their repetition in this place is necessary for the purpose of elucidating the conclusions of the writer of the article in the Athenæum.

"The estimates of the values of the quantity of gold and silver existing in Europe and America, at the commencement of the year 1848, are taken from the work of M. Chevalier, on money, published in 1850.

“No supplies had been received from California till late in 1848. The total stock of gold and silver in the year 1500, when America was discovered, is computed at £40,000,000 sterling, of which the amount of gold was only £12,000,000. This sum, compared with the large amount received from the mines of America, subsequent to 1500, accounts for the great revolution in the value of gold, which took place soon after the voyage of Columbus.

"In 1848, however, there was a large accumulation of gold and silver in the world, on which the new and large supplies could operate but slowly in any alteration of value, compared with the immediate effect produced in the value of money at the time of the discovery and first working of the South American mines.

"In 1848, there was a mass of £1,727,000,000 sterling of both metals. ESTIMATE OF THE VALUE OF THE TOTAL QUANTITY OF GOLD AND SILVER EXISTING IN VARIOUS FORMS IN EUROPE AND AMERICA AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE YEAR 1848.

Silser.

Gold. America..

£1,087,000,000 £101,000,000 Europe.

90,000,000 25,000,000 Russia ..

13,000,000 44,000,000 Africa and other places .

100,000,000 Total.....

£1,180,000,000 £570,000,000 As existing A. D. 1500...

28,000,000 12,000,000

£1,208,000,000

Total....
Add silver

£582,000,000
1,208,000,000

Total pounds sterling ......

£1,790,000,000 Deduct for exportation, wear and tear, and losses by casualties... 64,000,000 Leaving ....

£1,726,000,000 “A third part of this was gold. And if we suppose, as we have reason to believe, that the new produce yielded by the sources of supply in California and Australia will amount annually to £20,000,000 sterling, or $100,000,000, a few years will lead to an important alteration in the present exchangeable value of gold. The new supply would then be at the annual increase of 33 per cent on the stock existing in 1848. In 1860 and in 1861 the increase was actually at the rate of 2 to 24 per cent on the stock of gold in 1848.

“The annual supply of the precious metals in 1800 and 1848 is stated as follows:

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