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The Elements of Banking. By HENRY DUNNING MACLEOD. London: Longmans, Green, & Co. 16mo. pp. xiii, 270.

G. 1. T.; or, The Wonderful Adventures of a Pullman. By EDWARD E. HALE. Boston: Roberts Brothers. 16mo. pp. x, 221.

Hetty's Strange History. “No Name Series." Boston : Roberts Brothers. 16mo.

History of the College of New Jersey, from its origin in 1746, to the Commencement of 1854. By JOHN MACLEAN, Tenth President of the College. Philadelphia : J. B. Lippincott & Co. 2 vols. 8vo.

pp. 414, 450.

Einfluss des englischen Quakerthums auf die deutsche Cultur und auf das englisch-russische Project einer Weltkirche. By Bruno BAUER. Berlin : Verlag von Eugen Grosser. Crown 8vo. pp. 236.

Live Questions in Psychology and Metaphysics. By Prof. W. D. WilSON son. New York: D. Appleton & Co. 12mo. pp. 164.

Some Suggestions with regard to the Insanities of Females. By MonTROSE A. PALLEN, A. M., M. D. New York: William Wood & Co. 8vo.

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pp. 14.

Forbidden Fruit. By Rosalie Kauffman. Boston : Estes & Lauriat.

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Alger, William Rounseville, his life of Edwin

Forrest, notice of, 379 – 381.
America in Africa, article on, by Gilbert

Haven, 147 – 158 — Africa the realm of
romance, 147 — progress of discovery in
Africa, 148 – Africa as a market, 149
activity of European nations in African
trade, 150

- Africa as an outlet for popu-
lation, 151 — Africans in America, 152 —
attempts to establish American colonies in
Africa, 153 — Part II., 517 - 528 — produc-
tions of Africa, 517— its political condi-
tion and population, 518- its necessities,
521 — traffic with islands and coast, 522 —
annexation, 525 — railroad to Cairo, 527.
American Constitution, The, article on, by

Oliver P. Morton, Part II., 68-78 - de-
fects in American electoral system, 68 —
necessity for reform, 69 — intentions of
framers of Constitution, 71 — departures
from original plan, 72 — failure of Electo-
ral College to represent will of people, 73
— advantages of voting by districts over
present method, 74.
Baker, James, his Turkey, notice of, 168–

169.
Blavatsky, H, P., his Isis Unveiled, notice

of, 578 - 579.
Campbell, George, his Log Letters from Her

Majesty's Ship Challenger, notice of, 387 –

389.
Carpenter, W. B., his Mesmerism, Spiritual.

ism, etc., notice of, 390 – 391.
Cheveley Novels, The, A Modern Minister,

notice of, 169 - 170.
Crowe, J. A., and G. B. Cavalcaselle, their

Titian, notice of, 164 - 165.
Discovery, Progress in Astronomical, article

on, 363 – 370 — lunar theory, 363 — recent
works on double stars, 363 — great tele-
scopes of the future, 365 - comots of 1877,

astronomical expedition to Ascen-
sion Island, 369,- new Durchmusterung,

370 — new satellites to Mars, 370.
Douse, T., Le Marchant, his Grimm's Law,

notice of, 177 - 182.
Drama, Décline of the, article on, by Dion

Boucicault, 285 -- 246 — drama said to be
declining for two thousand years, 235
criticisms of Addison and Goldsmith ap-

plicable to entertainments of present day,
236 — dramatic literature classified, 236
- sentimental drama,237—Shakespearian
age, 238 – educational progress, 238
demands of present century, 239 de-
structive influence of newspaper press,
240 — - information needed by dramatic
critic, 242 — commercial management and
its evils, 243.
Electoral Conspiracy, The, article on, by J. ;
S. Black, 1 - 34 — public mind affected by

counting in " of Haves, 1- - indignation
of Democrats and satisfaction of Repub.
licans, 1—position of Democracy during
War of Rebellion, 3 — pledges of Republi-
cans to Democrats broken, 4 injustice
of Reconstruction Act of 1867, 4 - char-
acter of " carpet-baggers," 5 — results of
carpet-bag rule, 7 — responsibility of ad-
ministration, 10 — unpopularity of carpet-
bag government, 11 - origin of Returning
Board, 11 — powers of Board, 12 — its
illegality, 12 — first acts of Board, 13-
efforts of Southern Democrats to preserve
electoral franchise, 14 - charges of intimi-
dation against Democrats unsustained, 15
— revolt of negroes against carpet-baggers,
16 — personnel of Board, 17 — alteration of
election returns, 18 — Republican wit-
nesses of Louisiana count considered, 19.
course pursued by Gen. Grant, 21 — ap-
pointment of Commission by Congress, 23

duties of Commission, 24 - decision in
support of fraud by Commission, 25 - at-
tempt of Board to justify its conduct, 25

– hedging for Oregon, 26 — evidence sup-
pressed by Commission, 28 — case of Flor-
ida, 29 — veneration for forms of law by
Commission, 32 - unreasonable discrimi-
nations made by Commission,32 — right of
American people to elect their chief mag-

istrate, 33.
Electoral Conspiracy Bubble Exploded, The,
article on, by E. W. Stoughton, 193 – 234

antecedents of Judge J. S. Black, 193
- statements made by him, 194 -base-
ness of his charges, 196 -position of coun-
try, 197 — provisions of Electoral Bill, 198
- charges of conspiracy analyzed, 199 —
motives of lawyers who appeared before

369 --

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Commission, 200 — duties of Commission,
201 - powers of State and Congress, 201—
finality of legislative decisions, 202 — jus-
tice of system practised, 203 — illustration
by case of Louisiana, 204 – - intentions of
framers of Constitution, 206 — results that
would follow were Congress given greater
power, 207

· governors not organs to de-
clare electors, 208 — situation in Oregon,
209 — Florida, 211 - quo warranto pro-
ceedings, 213 — legality of action of Com-
mission, 215 — Judge Black as attorney-
general, 217 — his participation in Rebel-
lion, 219 — Northern men and capital in
South, 222 — outrages in South, 225
causes for creation of Returning Board,
227 witnesses of count of electoral vote,

233.
Fields, James T., his Underbrush, notice of,

594 - 595.
France, The Situation in, article on, 529 -

543 diversity of political conceptions in
Europe, 529 — English views of French
action, 530

- need of uniformity in Cop-
servatism, 531 - French ideas of foreign
criticism, 532 — prospect ot Radical rule
considered, 533 — terrors of apprehension,
534 — statements of members of cabinet,
535 — estimates of opposing forces, 536
- personal pecuniary interest a defence
against Radicalism, 537— re-establishment
of monarchy improbable, 538 — mistaken
policy pursued under Marshal MacMahon,
539 — his position, 540 — Socialism de-
stroyed by free institutions, 541 — arbi-
trariness of Conservatives, 542 — respon-
sibility of originators of Act of 16th of

May, 543.
Furness, Horace Howard, his New Edition

of Shakespeare, notice of, 392 – 393.
Gill, William F., his The Lifé of Edgar Allen

Poe, notice of, 580 - 582.
Gobineau, his Nouvelles Asiatiques, notice of,

182-183.
Grisebach, Eduard, his Study of a Chinese

Novel, notice of, 159 - 161.
Halleck, Fitz-Greene, article on, by Bayard

Taylor, 60 - 67 - monument to Halleck,
60 - Halleck a pioneer in literature, 60
– nature and early development of his
genius, 61 -

- his prominent poems, 62 -
quality of his productions, 62 — his char-
acter and opinions, 63 — his personal ap-
pearance, 64 — his last days, 66.
Hassurd, John R. G., his Richard Wagner

at Bayreuth, notice of, 162 - 163.
Hodgkins, George, his Report on the Ontario

Exhibit, notice of, 391–392.
Hoffman, Wickham, his Camp, Court and

Siege, notice of, 171 - 172.
Holland, J. G., his Nicholas Minturn: A

Study in a Story, notice of, 588 – 589,
Hugo, Victor, his Art d'être Grand-Père,

notice of, 393 -- 394.
Huxley, Roscoe, and Balfour Stewart, their

Science Primers, notice of, 165 - 166.
Huxley, Thos. H., his American Addresses,

with a Lecture on the Study of Biology,
notice of, 595 – 596.

Judaism, Reformed, article on, by Felix Ad-
ler, 133 - 146 - peculiarities of Jews, 133

changes within last century, 134 —
purity of their domestic relations, 134
their schools, 137 – organization of syna-
gogue, 139 -

influence of persecution,
140. Part II., 327 - 350 - Mendelssohn,
327 — Bible, 328 — social standing, 332 —
Paris, the New Jerusalem, 334 — Liturgy,
335 “Hep-Hep,” 339 — science of Jus
daism, 340 — scientific theology, 341 —
principles, 345 — prospects, 349.
Kitchin, G. W., his A History of France, Vols.

II. and III., notice of, 576 – 578.
La Marmora, Alphonse, bis Secrets d'État
dans le Gourernment Constitutionel, notice

of, 382 - 383.
Lange, his Commentary on the Holy Scrip-

tures, notice of, 183 - 185.
La Salle, Cavelier de, article on, by Francis

Parkman, 427 - 438 — origin and charac-
teristics, 427 — letters, 428 - plans, 429 —
difficulties first encountered, 430 — jour-
ney from Peoria to Fort Frontenac, 431 —
destruction of fort and colony in Illinois,
433 — exploration of Mississippi River,
434 — answers to criticisms, 435 - official
power turned against him, 437 — deficien-

cies as a leader of men, 438.
Lodge, Henry Cabot, his Life and Letters of

George Cabot, notice of, 582 -584.
Mac Donald, George, his Marquis of Lossie,

notice of, 383 - 384.
Mc Coan, J. C., his Egypt As It Is, notice of,

584 - 585.
Meyer, Bruno, his Studies and Criticisms,

notice of, 173-175.
Michelangelo and the Buonnarroti Archives,

article on, by T. Adolphus Trollope, 499 –
516 — will of Cavaliere Buonnarroti, 499–
early surroundings of Michelangelo, 500 -
development of his genius, 501 — his ac-
quaintance with Vittoria Colonna, 502 —
his poems, 503 — his manners and personal
appearance, 504 --- his art-works in middle
life, 505 — his letters to Lionardo, 506 -
his plainness of speech, 508 – his religious
sentiments, 509 -- his labors at St. Peter's
Church, 510 — his happiness, 511 – his
death, 512 - his operations at Sistine
Chapel, 513 – details of his painting at
chapel, 514 — his methods of work, 515 —

his genius, 516.
Miller, Joaquin, his Baroness of New York,

notice of, 591 - 592.
Moral Reflexions, by a Japanese Traveller,

79 - 93 - Americans attach too much
value to names, 79 — vices and virtues of
countries differ, 79 — American missiona-
ries, 80 — Christians compared with Ma-
hometans and Buddhists, 81 - effects of
Christian example upon people of Japan,
82 — corruption of Christian cities, 82 —
teachings of Confucius, 83 — disrespect
towards public officials, in America, 83 —
Phariseeism of America, 85 - sale of
Christian clergymen and churches, 85 —
appreciation of character in Japan, 86
Confucius on hypocrisy, 87 — Commer-

- frauds per-

-

pas-

cial experience of Japan with Christian merce with British Provinces, 288 — value
countries, 88 — - business practices in Lon- of domestic freight exchanges , 289 — ad-
don and New York, 88 — duties of clergy- vantages to be secured by free trade with
men in financial affairs, 88 –

Canada, 290 — -annexation considered, 291
petrated by professors of religion, 89 - resources of Canada, 294 operation
effects of observations of Japanese travel- of Reciprocity Treaty, 295 General
lers, 90 · way of heaven, 9i.

Grant's views in regard to San Domingo,
Morgan, Lewis H., his Ancient Society, or 298 — trade with Canada examined, 299

Researches in the Lines of Human Prog- relations with Canada not exceptional,
ress, from Savagery through Barbarism

300 —

effect of legal enactments upon
to Civilization, notice of, 589 - 591.

commerce with Chili, 301 — advantages
Nineteenth Century, The, notice of, 172 - possessed by English manufacturers, 302
173.

character of trade between England and
Novels, New American, article on, by Ed- Chili, 303 — effect of duties upon traffic

ward L. Burlingame, 309 – 321 The with Argentine Republic, 306 — results
American, 309 — its literary finish, 309 with Australia and New Zealand, 308
its intellectual character, 310 its dissim- Part III., 544 - 556 — necessity for enlarged
ilarity to previous works by its author, 311 markets in foreign countries, 544 - need
- its hero, 312 — contrasts in personages of steamship transportation, 545 — Ameri-
described in it, 313 defects in its de- can shipping decreased, 546 - early sec-
nouement, 314 — Garth, 315 — peculiari- tional interests affecting navigation, 547 —
ties of its style, 315 — its inconsistencies, compromise between sections, 548 —
316 - - A Modern Mephistopheles, 316 — sage of arbitrary laws, 549 — - their provis-
its plot, 317 — its merits, 318 — That Lass ions, 550 — illustrations of their operation,
o'Lowrie's, 318 — description of charac- 551 — additional legislation, 552 — remov-
ters delineated, 318 — The Jericho Club, al of restrictions in other countries, 553
The Barton Experiment, The Scripture opposition to free trade in England, 554 —
Club of Valley Rest, 319 — their tentative increase of tonnage in England resulting
character, 319 — relative merits, 320 — from free trade, 555.
Nimport, First Love is Best, 321.

r

Publications Received, 190 – 192, 396, 598.
Parkman, Francis, his Count Frontenac and Reade, Charles, his A Woman-Hater, notice

New France under Louis XIV., notice of, of, 389 - 390.
585-587.

Reid, T. Wemyss, his Charlotte Bronté, no-
Puyer, Julius, his New Lands within the tice of, 394 – 395.
Arctic Circle, notice of, 163 - 164.

Resumption of Specie Payment, article on,
Perpetual Forces, article on, by Ralph Wal- by Hugh McCulloch, William D. Kelley,

do Emerson, 271 – 282 — importance of David A. Wells, Thomas Ewing, Joseph
em.ploying every advantage, 271 opera- S. Ropes, and John Sherman, 397 - 426
tion of natural agencies, 272 - compensa- opinion of Hugh McCulloch, 397 – 404
tions of nature, 274 - parallels between plethora of paper money, cause of finan-
mind and matter, 273 — ability of man to cial troubles, 397 — protection against
use the elements, 275 — man's resources, over-issue by banks, 397 — impropriety of
276 — value of persistency, 277

legal-tender acts, 398 — probable inability
cealed powers, 278 - effects of sensibility, of government to redeem its notes in 1879,
279 – desire of man to make use of forces 399 — impracticability of repealing Re-
of nature for private ends, 280 — disasters dempticn Act of 1875, 400 -- manner in
logically follow attempts to do without jus- which legal-tender notes can be with-
tice, 281 – timidity discreditable, 281. drawn, 401 — reduction of currency not
Perry, Arthur Latham, his Introduction to likely to cause large decrease of prices, 402

Political Economy, notice of, 185 – 186. - disadvantages of use of silver as a stand-
Prosperity, How shall the Nation regain? ard, 402 - opinion of William D. Kelley,

article on, by David A. Wells, 110 - 132 404 - 408 - cause of paralysis of indus-
equality of results of labor, 110 — advan- tries and trade, 405 – origin of Resump-
tages possessed by United States, 112 — tion Act, 405 — impossibility of its execu-
wages and interest, 113 — abundance of tion, 406 — extract from letter by Henry
supplies and lack of demand, 115 — ina- C. Carey, 407 — opinion of David A.
bility of nations to purchase, 116 — re- Wells, 408 - 412 — difficulties in way of
quirements of families, 119 — changes in repeal of Resumption Act, 408 — obliga-
trade produced by improvements, 122 — tion of government to pay interest in case
increase in power of production and dis- of delay in paying principal, 409 — pro-
tribution manifested in novel manner, 124 priety of funding legal-tender notes, 410
- disposition to be made of surplus labor, – powers of Secretary of Treasury to
126 — opportunities for effecting desir- carry Resumption Act into effect, 411-
able social and economic changes becom- opinion of Thomas Ewing, 412 - 416 -ob-
ing fewer, 128 duties of public teachers, ject of Resumption Act to destroy legal-
131 - Part II., 283 - 308 – illiinitability of tender notes, 412 — resumption cannot be
man's wants, 284 — principles involved in maintained without large and rapid reduc-
trade, 286 – reasons why demand for tion of circulation, 413 —

- operation of
productions of United States is not greater, British Resumption Law, 414 — results to
287 -- evil effects of restrictions npon com- be expected from resumption, 416 — im-

-con-

105

racy, 108.

portance of repealing act, 416 — opinion Stephen, Leslie, his Essays on Free Think-
of Joseph S. Ropes, 416 - 420 — difficulty ing and Plain Speaking, notice of, 592 –
lies not in re-umption, but in re-establish- 594.
ment of specie standard, 416 – effects of Strikes, The Recent, article on, by Thomas
uncertainty, 417 — amount of currency A. Scott, 351 - 362 — review of facts in
possible to be sustained on par with specie, connection with, 351 - origin of, 352 —
418 — means of resuming safely, 419 — causes of general financial depression, 353
opinion of John Sherman, 420 - 426 — business interests assisted by railways,
error of attributing financial distress to 354 — responsibility of railway employés
Resumption Act instead of to inflation, for disturbances, 355 — right of railways to
420- object of Resumption Act, 422 protection, 356 — necessity for prompt ac-
new plans for resumption not desirable, tion by authorities, 357 – inadequacy of
423 -- projects considered, 424 — - power present means to suppress riots, 358 -
given by Resumption Act, 425 — public losses to government by strikes, 359 — im-
faith not likely to be impaired, 426.

portance for distribution of military forces,
Russia, New, article on, by M. W. Hazeltine, 360 - demand of early Congressional ac-

94-109 abolishment of serfdom, 94- tion, 361 -- just intentions of railway man-
gradual progress of, 96 — unequal effects

agers, 362.
of, 96 — disappointment of liberated serfs Symonds, John Addington, his Renaissance
in, 97 essential features of communal in Italy, The Revival of Learning, The
system, 98 — stability of, 99 -- causes of Fine Arts, notice of, 371 - 374.
immorality connected with, 102 - condi- Tegnér, Esaias, his Frithjof's Saga, no-
tion of woman, 102 — moral and religious tice of, 187 - 189.
status of clergy, 103 — social position of, Ulrici, Herman, his Treatises upon Art His-

characteristics of national church, tory as Applied Æsthetics, notice of, 175 –
106 —

-progressive tendency of noblesse, 177.
107 failure to create intelligent aristoc Unbelief, The ,Functions of, article on, by

Thomas Hitchcock, 462 - 471- mankind
Sellar, W. Y., his The Roman Poets of the naturally divided into believers and un-
Augustan Age, notice of, 587 - 588.

believers, 462 — unbelief niost conspicu-
Southern Question, The article on, by ous in religious matters, 463 - moral

Charles Gavarré, 472 – 498 — origin of character independent of belief, 464 —
question, 472 — relations resulting from results that would follow suppression of
slavery, 473 – cause of antagonism between unbelief, 464 — unbelief a preventive of
North and South, 474 — secret of South- imposture and fanaticism, 465 — punish-

influence, 476 — Northern opposi- ments inflicted upon unbelievers in un-
tion to slavery prompted by political and civilized times, 465 — believers receiving
not by humanitarian considerations, 477 benefit of work done by unbelievers, 466 —

err

present form of Southern problem more religious faith purged of error by scepti-
difficult than former one, 478 — condition cism, 467 — wholesome influence of unbe-
of South after war, 479 — question of races lief in political affairs and criminal juris-
now the only question, 481 – injustice of prudence, 469 — unbelief and the doctrines
government in giving control of South to of immortality, 469 — mental condition of
negroes, 482 — abuses under negro rule, believers and unbelievers compared, 470.
483 — necessity for frank statement of Ultramontane Movement in Canada, The,
Southern views, 484 — restoration of self- article on, by Charles Lindsey, 557 - 575
government, 485 — natural tendency of Canadian pre-eminence in Catholicism,
strong races to destroy weak ones, 486 557 - operations of Zouaves, 558 - con-
sexual relations between whites and trol of press, 559 — liberty of religious
blacks, 487 —

- negro presumption, 488 – opinion prohibited, 560 – teachings of
prejudices between mulattoes and negroes, priests, 561 — claims of jurisdiction, 563
489 — hybrids, 490 — unreasonableness of condemnation of civil marriages, 563 —
claims of hybrids to represent blacks po- punishments inflicted upon newspapers,
litically, 491 — importance of races being 564- first attempt to control elections,
kept as distinct as possible, 492 — distri-

right to control political affairs
bution of patronage according to color claimed, 566 - rulings of bishops, 567
an outrage, 493 – the South better quali- contradictory orders, 568 support of ex-
fied than the North to settle the posi. treme measures by Pope, 569 — - objections
tion of the negro, 494 —

Caucasian suprem- from people, 570 — influence of priests
acy essential to peace and prosperity, 495 upon electors, 571 — priests sustained by

confidence of negroes in white men, 496 a judge, 572 — their action condemned by
-- future to bring relief for difficulties, 497 Supreme Court, 573 — - repeated cases of
- object of author, 498.

intimidation, 574 — rupture between civil
Spencer, Herbert, his Principles of Sociology, and ecclesiastica! Di SweHistory
notice of, 167 - 168.

LounHenri, History of French
Spry, W. J., his Cruise of Her Majesty's Literature, III., notice of, 597.

Ship Challenger, notice of, 386 – 387. Viking Tales of the North, notice of, 187 –
Squier, E. George, his Peru, notice of, 374 -

189.
379.

Wages, Fair, article on, by A Striker, 322

565 -

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