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INCOME
Profit on sale of publications, etc..
Dues
Interest on investments.
Miscellaneous

$59.323.91 10,626.80 4,080.86

276.78 $74.308.35

This report of audit was accepted and approved by the Board of Control, for publication, January 31, 1919.

G. M. RAVENSCROFT,

Secretary and Treasurer,

U.S. Naval Institute.

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The 7" NAVAL TRACTOR MOUNT FIRING AT 30° ELEVATION. SEE PROFESSIONAL Notes UNDER ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY.

PROFESSIONAL NOTES

PREPARED BY

COMMANDER S. A. TAFFINDER, U. S. Navy

GENERAL ARRANGEMENT

259 260 262 270

VESSELS BUILDING.
CHARACTERISTICS OF NAVAL Ves-
SELS.

France
NAVAL POLICY.

Germany MATÉRIEL.

Great Britain
PERSONNEL.

United States
OPERATIONS
MERCHANT MARINE.
ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY.
NAVIGATION AND RADIO..
ENGINEERING
AERONAUTICS
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES
CURRENT NAVAL AND PROFESSIONAL PAPERS.

277 280 281 285 286 287

FRANCE. A New FRENCH CRUISER.-Reports from Paris indicate that the LamottePiquet, the nameship of a new class of light cruisers, is either completed or approaching completion. It is nearly 20 years since France launched a vessel of this type, preference having been given to large and expensive armored cruisers, which have proved very wasteful to run, and much too slow to be of value as scouts. "The Lamotte-Piquet is a distinctive design, and appears to possess several points of advantage over her foreign contemporaries. She is 453 ft. in length, 4574 ft. in beam, draws 16/2 ft., and displaces either 4100 or 4500 tons. She is fitted with Parsons turbines, driving four shafts, and has twelve Du Temple-Guyot boilers, of which eight are oil-fired. The turbines are expected to develop 42,000 horsepower, giving a speed of 32 knots. The armament comprises eight 5-inch Q. F. guns of a new model, 55 calibers in length, using an 81-1b. projectile, and so disposed as to give a broadside of six and an end-on fire of four guns, all of which have excellent arcs of fire. Unusually good protection to the gun crews is afforded by 6-inch shields, while four of the weapons are mounted in broadside casemates of the same thickness. The hull for two-thirds of its length is protected by a 2-inch belt, associated with a 34-inch deck. The Lamotte-Piquet was built at Toulon, and her two sisters at private yards. They are officially styled "conveyeurs d'escadrilles.”—The Engineer 13/12.

FRENCH FLEET BOUND FOR GERMAN PORTS.-Announcement was made at the Ministry of Marine to-day that a French naval division, composed of five units, of which the armored cruiser Montcalm is the flagship, is on its way to the Baltic Sea, having received orders to survey the carrying out by the Germans of the clauses of the armistice.

The vessels also will visit German ports where French prisoners are assembled in order to insure their repatriation under the best possible conditions.—N. Y. Times, 23/12.

FRANCE TO DOUBLE ITS MERCHANT FLEET.--According to the Paris Matin, Fernand Bouisson, Under Secretary of State for the Merchant Marine, has announced that within five years France will have merchant ships with a total capacity of 6,000,000 tons, which is double its pre-war tonnage. It is said that the greater part of the fleet will be composed of new vessels.Nautical Gazette, 11/30.

FRENCH CASUALTIES AND COSTS.—The French High Commission authorizes publication of the following:

FRENCH LOSSES DURING THE WAR
Up to November 1, 1918:
Dead (killed in action and dead of wounds)

1,028,800 Missing (given up for lost) ....

299,000

1,327,000

Total (Colonial troops not included)
Colonial troops :

Dead
Missing

42,500
15,000

Grand total of dead and missing

1,385,300 Wounded (about)

3,000,000
[Of which 700,000 crippled and pensioned. To
this figure must be added a great number of the
435,000 Frenchmen war prisoners henceforth un-

fit to work.]
Grand total of French casualties

4,385,300
COST OF WAR TO FRANCE
Expenses-$23,500,000,000 (up to December 31, 1918)
Damages-$13,000,000,000 (approximate figure).
Pensions-$8,000,000,000 (approximate figure).

-U. S. Bulletin, 14/1.

GERMANY CAPTAIN PERSIUS ON GERMAN SUBMARINES.- The naval critic, Captain Persius, recently stated in the Berlin press that in 1917 only 83 submarines were constructed, while 66 were destroyed. He tells us that in April, 1917, Germany had 126 submarines and in October, 146. In February, 1918, she had 136 and in June of this year, 113. He verifies the statement of Admiral Simś that very few submarines operated at one time. In January, 1917, only 12 per cent were active, while 30 per cent were in harbor, 38 per cent under repairs and 20 per cent incapacitated. Submarine crews were insufficiently trained and distrusted the submarine, while experienced seamen looked upon the submarine warfare as a “political stupidity."-Scientific American, 21/12.

FINDS 170 U-Boats BEING BUILT.—One hundred and seventy submarines, all under construction, were found when the Interallied Naval Commission visited Germany to make arrangements for the carrying out of the terms of the armistice, according to newspapers here. These U-boats, it is said, will be turned over to the Allies:-Mash. Evening Star, 4/1.

ALLIES Will DESTROY PARTLY BUILT U-BOATS.--New Armistice Terms Penalise German Trick-Our Commissioners go to Treves.-- The four

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