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135 AMMUNITION EXPENDITURE.

ANNUALLY, June 30. To: Bureau of Ordnance. Form: N. Ord. 70a. By: Ordnance officer through C. O. BuOrd. letter 27777 (I) 6/20 circular No. 4, April 19, 1913, requires annual

report of expenditures of ammunition for fiscal year and cost thereof.

File: 4.

136 EQUIPAGE, TITLE “B” BALANCE

ANNUALLY, June 30.
SHEET.
Balance sheet for equipage, title "B,” together with abstract of receipts and

expenditures.
To: Bureau S. & A.
Form:
By: Supply officer through C.O.

137 PHYSICAL Test oF OFFICERS.

ANNUALLY, January I. To: Bureau of Navigation, Form: By each officer through C. O. reporting having completed all tests for pre

vious year, and including record of physical examination for current year. (Waived during war times.)

138

PAY OF ENLISTED FORCE.

ANNUALLY. To: Bureau of Navigation direct. Form: 270. By: P. O. Report showing the pay of the enlisted force for specified

month. The bureau sends out the form and the flotilla paymaster pre

pares it for the ship. It is signed by C. O. and then forwarded. Art. 5221, Sec. 3 (2) I.

139 BATTLE SIGNAL Books, GENERAL ANNUALLY, January 1, or when SERVICE Radio Codes TACTICAL

relieved of command. SIGNAL. To: Naval Operations. Form: N. Nav. 2Q, N. Nav. IQ. By: C. O. (direct). All registered numbers of all confidential publications issued by operations

are to be listed in this annual report. Ref.: I. 5221 (39). File: 12 and 12-2.

140 SANITARY REPORT.

ANNUALLY, January 1. To: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, through the C.-in-C. for approval

and forwarding. Form: Letter. Three copies, one to M. & S., one for base commander. By: M. O. through C. O. File: 202.

141 DESCRIPTION OF Radio PLANT.

ANNUALLY, December 31. To: Steam Engineering through C.-in-C. Form: N. S. E. 25. By: Senior engineer officer through C. O. In duplicate: C.-in-C. (1), Department (1). Copies to F. C. and B. C.

The “system” has been paid the most sincere flattery, having been copied repeatedly by many ships, both destroyers and others, including battleships. It is probable, therefore, that a number of officers are acquainted with the system.

The tedious detail work entailed in perfecting this system, the careful searching through files, regulation books, and pamphlets, to collect the data for inspections and reports, and the tabulation of data was done by my wife who spent over four months in 1910 to insure the system's accuracy.

Since her original successful efforts, I have attempted to keep it up to date. Everyone who contemplates using the system is advised to check it to insure that it covers the requirements of his particular type of ship.

(COPYRIGHTED)
U. S. NAVAL INSTITUTE, ANNAPOLIS, MD.

WINNING THE ENGINEERING WHITE E

By COMMANDER BRUCE R. WARE, JR., U. S. Navy

In December, 1915, the U. S. S. Texas was standing about 14th in the engineering competition. She finished the year June 30, 1916, in second place, having gained 13 places in six months; the next year, however, she finished in first place and won the white E.

The first step towards winning the competition was taken at a conference in the senior engineer officer's stateroom. Here it was agreed by all hands, deck, ship and engineers, to get together in earnest in order to win, not only the white E, but the gunnery trophy and the battle efficiency pennant. The order of the day from then on was to be “ Co-operation for the ship!”

Therefore, with the welfare of the entire ship in view, each officer was assigned the duties for which he was best fitted. Thus assigned, we all started to get acquainted with our ship. Careful inspections and intensive observations were made of the crew and the machinery. Operating data, pressures and other values were recorded at all points throughout the ship.

About a week before the fleet went to Guantanamo in January, 1916, the data accumulated were analyzed and it was decided to concentrate at once upon the following three points :

1. To get the crew interested.
2. To systematize.

3. To teach and encourage true economy: The winning of the gunnery trophy proved the success on deck. The co-operation received below from the deck also merits notice. From here on, however, this article will treat with the engineering struggle into the first place.

The three principal points enumerated above were subdivided as follows: 1. To get the crew interested :

a. Publish information.
b. Entertain the crew—make the men happy.
c. Rate our own men up to fill vacancies.

d. Show the men the results of their work.
2. To systematize:

a. Auxiliary watches.
b. Steaming watches.
c. Liberty and leave.
d. Advancements in rating.
Organizations:

1. Auxiliary stations.
2. Fire-rooms.
3. Engine-rooms.
4. Power and light.
5. Fresh-water tank-galleys, washrooms and

laundry.

6. Turrets and torpedo-room.
3. To teach and encourage true economy:

a. Calibrate all instruments.
b. Record performances methodically.
c. Evade nothing—analyze performances with accuracy

and fairness.
d. Teach methods of obtaining economy:

1. By illustrated lectures.
2. By personal supervision.

3. By enforcing every order published.
e. Periodical upkeep.
f. Constant study of the machinery installation for im-

provement. g. Constant study of the rules for the engineering com

petitions and explaining them to the officers

and men. h. Coaling ship. An inspection of the fire-rooms under way disclosed that the men knew practically nothing about intelligent firing, and as the coal that would be used en route to Guantanamo would be an important percentage of the total used for the year, it became

urgent to adopt correct methods. Accordingly, colored slides were made and illustrated lectures on firing were immediately started. The system of firing taught and developed differed materially from any system in use ashore or afloat.

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The boiler layout is shown in Sketch No. 1. All the boilers are fitted with superheaters excepting Nos. 5 and 6 in fire-room No. 2. There are four furnace doors to each boiler. The bunker doors are indicated by the small b's. The forced draft blowers, two for each fire-room, one port and one starboard, are directly over the fire-rooms. In order that the men would benefit from

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