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Government should recognize it as the official consultative authority to the Government upon industrial relations, and should make it the nominal channel through which the opinion and experience of industry will be sought on all questions with which industry as a whole is concerned.

In addition to advising the Government the Council should, when it thought fit, issue statements on industrial questions or disputes for the guidance of public opinion.

OBJECTS To ensure the largest possible measure of joint action between the representative organizations of employers and workpeople, and to be the normal channel through which the opinion and experience of industry will be sought by the Government on all questions affecting industry as a whole.

It will be open to the Council to take any action that falls within the scope of its general definition. Among its more specific objects will be: (a) The consideration of general questions affecting industrial

relations. (6) The consideration of measures for joint or several action to

anticipate and avoid threatened disputes. (c) The consideration of actual disputes involving general ques

tions. (d) The consideration of legislative proposals affecting industrial

relations. (e) To advise the Government on industrial questions and on the

general industrial situation. (f) To issue statements for the guidance of public opinion on

industrial issues.

CONSTITUTION

1. The Council 1. The Council shall consist of four hundred members fully representative of and duly accredited by the employers' organizations and the trade unions, to be elected as to one-half by the employers' organizations and as to one-half by the trade unions.

2. Subject to the conditions stated in Clause 1, the method of election and allocation of representatives shall be determined by each side for itself. The scheme proposed by the trade union

members of the Committee for the election of trade union representatives is shown in Appendix B to this report.

3. Members of the Council shall retire annually, and shall be eligible for re-election by the organizations which they represent. Casual vacancies may be filled by the side in which the vacancy occurs, any member so appointed to sit until the end of the current year.

4. The Council shall meet at least twice a year, and in addition as often as the Standing Committee hereafter referred to deem to be necessary.

5. The Minister of Labor for the time being shall be President of the Council and shall, when possible, preside at its meetings. There shall be three Vice-Presidents, one appointed by the Government to be Chairman of the Standing Committee hereafter referred to, one elected by and from the employers' representatives on the Council, one elected by and from the trade unions' representatives. In the absence of the President, the Chairman of the Standing Committee shall preside, in his absence one of the other Vice-Presidents.

The Chairman of the Committee shall be a whole-time officer, and shall have associated with him two secretaries, one appointed by the employers' representatives on the Council, one appointed by the trade unions' representatives.

6. Voting. The two sides of the Council shall vote separately and no resolution shall be declared carried unless approved by a majority of those present on each side. Each side shall determine for itself the method of voting.

7. Finance. The expenses of the Council, subject to sanctions by the Treasury, shall be borne by the Government.

8. The Council shall be empowered to make Standing Orders for the conduct of its business.

II. The Standing Committee 1. There shall be a Standing Committee of the Council, consisting of twenty-five members elected by and from the employers' representatives of the Council, and twenty-five members elected by and from the trade union representatives.

2. The method of election of members shall be determined by rach side of the Council for itself. The scheme proposed by the frade union members of the Committee for the election of trade 'inion representatives is shown in Appendix B to this report.

3. The Standing Committee shall be empowered to take such action as it deems to be necessary to carry out the objects of the Council. It shall consider any questions referred to it by the Council or the Government, and shall report to the Council its decisions.

4. The Standing Committee shall be empowered to appoint an Emergency Committee and such Sub-Committees as may be necessary.

5. The Standing Committee shall be empowered to co-opt representatives of any trade not directly represented upon it for the consideration of any question affecting that trade.

6. The Standing Committee shall meet as often as may be necessary, and at least once a month.

7. The Government shall appoint a Chairman to the Standing Committee, who shall preside at its meetings, but shall have no vote. There shall be two vice-chairmen, one elected by and from the employers' representatives on the Committee, and one by and from the trade union representatives. In the absence of the chairman, the vice-chairman shall preside in turn.

8. The Standing Committee, with the consent of the Treasury, shall be empowered to appoint such secretaries and other officers as may be necessary for the conduct of its business.

9. The Standing Committee shall be empowered to make Standing Orders for the conduct of its business.

10. Finance. The expenses of the Standing Committee shall, subject to sanction by the Treasury, be born by the Government.

If any question arises as to the meaning or intention of this report, it should be referred for consideration to the National Industrial Council.

There has been apparent throughout the proceedings an earnest anxiety on the part of the representatives both of employers and employed to approach the subjects of their discussion in a spirit of mutual accommodation so as to arrive at a satisfactory settlement of outstanding difficulties. The Committee confidently believe that if effect is given to the recommendations now made, and if the same spirit that has characterized the deliberations of the Committee actuates the future consideration of other difficulties that exist or may arise, much will have been done to promote that spirit of mutual confidence which is a first essential to the effective and successful conduct of industry in the interests of employers and employed and the nation generally.

In conclusion the Committee desire to say that they welcome the steps now being taken in the direction of international regulation of labor conditions, as they believe that a satisfactory adjustment of labor conditions on an international basis will have a beneficial effect on industrial problems in this country.

The Committee desire to express their appreciation of the valuable services rendered by the following gentlemen: Mr. C. S. Hurst, Ministry of Labor

Secretary to Joint Committee
Mr. C. B. HAWKINS, Ministry of Labor
Mr. Henry CLAY, Ministry of Labor
Mr. G. T. Reid, Trade Boards

Secretaries to Sub-Committees

Mr. J. Mckie Bryce
Mr. A. MACFARLANE
Mr. F. H. PRYCE
Mr. F. D. LAMB

Secretaries to Employers' Representatives

Mr. G. D. H. Cole
Mr. W. HENDERSON
Mr. F. BRAMLEY

Secretaries to Trade Union Representatives (Signed)

T. MUNRO, Chairman

ALLAN M. Smith,
Chairman of Employers' Representatives

ARTHUR HENDERSON,

Chairman of Trade Union Representatives C. S. HURST, Secretary

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