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they shall not enter into the Channel of England, nor come to cruize, nor come in sight of any Port of His Majesty of Great Britain's Dominions any more for the time to come.

II. That whereas we bad declared, that all Ships and Vessels belonging to the said King of Great Britain should have Passes by the last of September, 1700, we do by these declare, at the desire of Captain John Munden, Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's Ships in the Mediterranean, and Robert Cole, Esq., His Majesty's Consul, now residing at our City of Algier, on the behalf of their Great Master, that no Passes shall be required or expected from any of the English Ships or Vessels in any part of the World; but that they shall proceed on their voyage, without producing or showing a Pass to any

of our Cruizers till the last of September, 1701: and after that time is expired, and any Ship of England be seized, not having a Pass, we do hereby declare, that the goods on that Ship shall be Prize; but the Master, Men, and Ship shall be restored, and the freight immediately paid to the said Master, to the utmost value, as if he should have gone safe to the Port whither he was bound.

III. That whereas Captain John Munden has given us good assurance that he had a great affront some years past from some of our rude Sailors at the Mould; we do hereby promise, that at all times, whenever any of the King of Great Britain's Ships of War come to this place, order shall be given to an Officer of the Government immediately, who shall attend at the Mould all the day-time, during their stay here, to prevent any such disorder for the future, that no misunderstanding may happen between us; and if any such disorder should happen, the Officer of the Mould shall secure the Person or Persons, and they shall be punished with the utmost severity.

IV. By the help of God, and if He please, these Articles now made between us shall be maintained : to the truth of which we have hereunto set our Seals in Algier, in the year of the Hegira, 1112, and is the account of the Christians, August 17, 1700.

(L.S.) JOHN MUNDEN. (L.S.) ROBERT COLE,

(4.)—ADDITIONAL ARTICLE between Great Britain and

Algiers.--Signed at Algiers, 101h August, 1701. Whereas on the 17th day of August, 1700, it was agreed between Mr. Robert Cole, His Majesty's Agent and Consul-General in this City and Kingdom, and Commodore Munden, on one part, and the Most Excellent Lord Mustapha Effendi Dey, on the other part; that whatsoever Ships or other Vessels should be brought into this Port or Kingdom, after the last day of September, 1701, without Passes, the goods on board said Ships or Vessels should be confiscated, but the Ships

and Men set at liberty, and the freight paid, which being represented to His Majesty by his trading Subjects to be of dangerous consequence to their estates, it is now therefore positively agreed, that the said Article of the 17th of August, 1700, be made null, void, and of no effect; but that the IVth Article made by Admiral Herbert, in the year 1682, stand firm and valid; and since several of His Majesty's Subjects are in divers remote parts of the World, on long voyages, and cannot, for that reason, be supplied with the necessary Passes, in the form and manner agreed in the aforesaid IVth Article, therefore it is concluded by this present Writing, that the Subjects of the King of Great Britain have till the last day of March, anno 1702, for their being furnished with such Instruments as in the IVth Article it is agreed; to the truth of which we have hereunto set our Hands and Seals in Algiers, the 10th day of August, anno 1701, which is the Turkish account 1113, in the Moon Rebea Awell.

(5.)— TREATY of Peace and Commerce between Great Britain and

Algiers.-Signed at Algiers, 28th October, 1703. ARTICLES of Peace and Commerce between the Most Serene and Mighty Princess Anne, by the grace of God, Queen of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illustrious Lord Mustapha Dey, the Bashaw, Aga, and Governors of the famous City and Kingdom of Algiers, in Barbary; ratified, confirmed, and renewed, by George Byng, Esq., Rear Admiral of the Red Squadron of Her Majesty's Fleet, on the 28th day of October, old style, 1703.

Art. I. In the first place it is agreed and concluded, that from this day, and for ever forwards, the Peace made by Arthur Herbert, Esq., then Admiral of Her Majesty's Fleet, in the Mediterranean, in the year 1682, and since confirmed by Sir William Soame, Bart., Ambassador to the Grand Signior, in the year 1686, with the Additional Articles agreed to with Captain Munden and Consul Cole, in the year 1700, be renewed and confirmed, (with the farther addition to the Articles agreed to in this Treaty with George Byng, Esq., Rear Admiral of the Red Squadron of Her Majesty's Fleet) be kept inviolable between the Most Serene Queen of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illustrious Lord Mustapha Dey, the Bashaw, Aga, and Governors of the famous City and Kingdom of Algiers, and between all the Dominions and Subjects of either side, and that the Ships and other Vessels, and the Subjects and People of both sides, shall not henceforth do to each other any harm, offence, or injury, either in word or deed, but shall treat one another with all possible respect and friendship, and that all demands and pretences whatsoever to this day, between both Parties, shall cease and be void.

II. That whereas, by the said Articles of Peace, made and concluded by Admiral Herbert, it was agreed the Subjects of England should pay 10 per cent. Custom for the goods they should sell at Algiers, or Dominions thereof. Now, for the better settling and maintaining a good commerce between the Subjects of England and those of Algiers, it is agreed and declared, that from henceforward the Subjects of England shall pay but 5 per cent. Custom for the goods they shall sell at Algiers, and that Contraband goods, as is declared before, shall pay no Custom.

III. And it is farther agreed and declared, that all Prizes taken by any of Her Majesty of Great Britain's Subjects, and all Ships and Vessels built and fitted out in any of Her Majesty's Plantations in America that have not been in England, shall not be molested in case of no Pass; but that a Certificate in writing under the hand of the Commanding Officers that shall so take Prizes, or Chief of any of Her Majesty's Plantations in America, or where any Ships shall be built or fitted, shall be a sufficient Pass to either of them : and our faith shall be our faith, and our word our word.

Confirmed and sealed in the presence of Almighty God, the 281h day of October, in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ, 1703, and in the year of the Hegira, 1115, and the Ist day of the Moon, Regep.

(L.S.) G. BYNG.

(6.)-TREATY of Peace and Commerce between Great Britain and

Algiers.--Signed at Algiers, 29th October, 1716. ARTICLES of Peace and Commerce between the Most Serene and Mighty Prince George, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illustrious Lord Ally, Dey, Bashaw, and Governor of the famous City and Kingdom of Algiers, in Barbary; ratified, confirmed, and renewed, by Captain Conigsby Norbury, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Argyle, Captain Nicholas Eaton, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Chester, and Thomas Thompson, Esq., His Majesty's Consul at Algiers, on the 29th day of October, 1716, by virtue of a Full Power given and granted to us by John Baker, Esq., Vice-Admiral of the Blue Squadron of His Britannic Majesty's Fleet, and Admiral and Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's Ships employed and to be employed in the Mediterranean.

Art. I. In the first place it is agreed and concluded, that from this day, and for ever forwards, the Peace made by Arthur Herbert, Esq., then Admiral of His Majesty's Fleet, in the Mediterranean in 1682; and since confirmed by Sir Wm. Soame, Bart., Ambassador to the Grand Signior, in 1686, with the Additional Articles agreed to with Capt. Munden and Consul Cole, in the year 1700. And likewise the farther Additional Articles agreed to with George Byng, Esq., then Rear-Admiral of the Red Squadron of Her Majesty's Fleet, in the year 1703, be renewed and confirmed, together with the Additional Articles agreed to in this Treaty, with Capt. Coningsby Norbury, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Argyle, Captain Nicholas Eaton, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Chester, and Thomas Thompson, Esq., His Majesty's Consul at Algiers, be kept inviolable between the Most Serene King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illustrious Lord Ally, Bashaw, Dey and Governor of the warlike City of Algiers in the West, the Aga, Kahya, and the rest of the Honourable Seniors of the Divan, and between all the Dominions and Subjects of either side; and that the Ships and other Vessels, and the Subjects and People of either side, shall not henceforth do to each other any harm, offence, or injury, either in word or deed, but shall treat one another with all possible respect and friendship. And if any demands or pretences shall be now left depending between the Subjects or others of either Party, they shall be amicably redressed, and full satisfaction shall be made to each other according to the truth and justice of their claim, and that this Treaty shall not cancel or make void the same.

II. That as the Island of Minorca, in the Mediterranean Sea, and the City of Gibraltar, in Spain, have been yielded and annexed to the Crown of Great Britain, as well by the King of Spain, as by all the several Powers of Europe engaged in the late War: now it is hereby agreed and fully concluded, that from this time forward for ever, the said Island of Minorca, and the City of Gibraltar, shall be esteemed in every respect, by the Government and People of Algiers, to be part of His Britannic Majesty's own Dominions, and the Inhabitants thereof to be looked upon as His Majesty's natural Subjects, in the same manner as if they had been born in any other part of Great Britain; and they, with their Slips and Vessels wearing British Colours, and being furnished with proper Passes, shall be permitted freely to trade and traffic in any part of the Dominions of Algiers, and shall pass without any molestation whatsoever, and shall have the same liberties and privileges that are stipulated in this, and have been made in all other Treaties in the behalf of the British Nation and Subjects; and therefore none of the Cruizers of Algiers shall at any time cruize within sight of the Ports of the said Island of Minorca, or City of Gibraltar.

III. That if an English Ship shall receive on board any Passengers and goods belonging to the Kingdom of Algiers, they shall defend them and their goods so far as lieth in their power, and not deliver them to their Enemies; and the better to prevent any unjust demands being made upon the Crown of Great Britain, and to avoid disputes and differences that may arise, all goods and merchandizes that shall from henceforward be shipped by the Subjects of Algiers, on board (1812–14.]

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the Ships or Vessels of Great Britain upon freight, shall be first registered in the Office of Cancellaria, before the British Consul residing in the Port where they are shipped, and the quantity, quality, and value thereof shall be expressed, and the Consul is to inanisest the same in the Clearance given to the Ship or Vessel before she shall depart; to the end, that if any cause of complaint should happen hereafter, there may be no greater claim made on the British Nation, than what by this method may be proved just and equitable.

IV. That if any of the Algerine Cruizers shall meet with any British Ships provided with Scollop Passes of either Ships or Sattees, that shall fit with those delivered to them by the British Consul, they shall

pass free and unmolested. Algiers, 29th October, 1716.

(L.S.) CON. NORBURY. (L.S.) N. EATON. (L.S.) THO. THOMPSON.

(7.)-TREATY of Peace and Commerce between Great Britain and

Algiers.-Signed at Algiers, 18th March, 1729. ARTicles of Peace and Commerce between the Most Serene and Mighty Prince, George the Second, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illustrious Lord Abdy, Dey, Bashaw and Governor of the famous City and Kingdom of Algiers, in Barbary; ratified, confirmed, and renewed by Philip Cavendish, Esq., Rear-Adiniral of the Red Squadron of His Britannic Majesty's Fleet, and Admiral and Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's Ships employed in the Mediterranean, being properly empowered for that purpose.

In the first place: It is agreed and concluded, that, from this day and for ever forward, the Peace made by Arthur Herbert, Esq. (in 1682), then Admiral of His Majesty's Fleet; and Sir William Soame, Bart., Ambassador to the Grand Signior, in the year 1686; with the Additional Articles agreed to with Captain Munden and Consul Cole, in the

year 1700; and likewise the farther Additional Articles agreed to with George Byng, Esq., then Rear-Admiral of the Red Squadron of Her Majesty's Fleet, in the year 1703; together with the Additional Articles agreed to with Captain Coningsby Norbury, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Argyle, Captain Nicholas Eaton, Commander of His Majesty's Ship, Chester, and Thomas Thompson, Esq., His Majesty's Consul at Algiers, in the year 1716, be renewed and confirmed in this Treaty with Philip Cavendish, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Red Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet; the same to be kept inviolable between the Most Serene King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c., and the Most Illus. trious Lord Abdy, Dey, Bashaw and Governor of the warlike City and Kingdom of Algiers, and between all the Dominions and Subjects on

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