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A Fable for the Critics.

PHOEBUS, sitting one day in a laurel-tree's shade, Was reminded of Daphne, of whom it was made, For the God being one day too warm in his wooing, She took to the tree to escape his pursuing;

Be the cause what it might, from his offers she shrunk,
And, Ginevra-like, shut herself up in a trunk;
And, though 'twas a step into which he had driven her,
He somehow or other had never forgiven her;
Her memory he nursed as a kind of a tonic,

Something bitter to chew when he'd play the Byronic,
And I can't count the obstinate nymphs that he brought over,

By a strange kind of smile he put on when he thought of her.

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My case is like Dido's," he sometimes remark'd,

When I last saw my love, she was fairly embark'd;

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Let hunters from me take this saw when they need it,
-You're not always sure of your game when you've tree'd it.
Just conceive such a change taking place in one's mistress!
What romance would be left ?-who can flatter or kiss trees?
And for mercy's sake, how could one keep up a dialogue
With a dull wooden thing that will live and will die a log,—
Not to say that the thought would forever intrude

That you've less chance to win her the more she is woo'd?
Ah! it went to my heart, and the memory still grieves,
To see those loved graces all taking their leaves;
Those charms beyond speech, so enchanting but now,
As they left me forever, each making its bough!

If her tongue had a tang sometimes more than was right,
Her new bark is worse than ten times her old bite."

Now, Daphne, before she was happily treeified,Over all other flowers the lily had deified,

And when she expected the god on a visit,
('Twas before he had made his intentions explicit,)
Some buds she arranged with a vast deal of care,
To look as if artlessly twined in her hair,

Where they seemed, as he said, when he paid his addresses,
Like the day breaking through the long night of her tresses;
So, whenever he wished to be quite irresistible,

Like a man with eight trumps in his hand at a whist-table, (I fear'd me at first that the rhyme was untwistable,

Though I might have lugged in an allusion to Cristabel,)—
He would take up a lily, and gloomily look in it,
As I shall at the when they cut up my book in it.

Well, here, after all the bad rhyme I've been spinning, I've got back at last to my story's beginning: Sitting there, as I say, in the shade of his mistress,

As dull as a volume of old Chester mysteries,

Or as those puzzling specimens, which, in old histories,
We read of his verses-the Oracles, namely,-

(I wonder the Greeks should have swallowed them tamely, For one might bet safely whatever he has to risk,

They were laid at his door by some ancient Miss Asterisk,
And so dull that the men who retailed them out-doors
Got the iil name of 'augurs,' because they were bores,)-
First, he mused what the animal substance or herb is
Would induce a moustache, for you know he's imberbis ;
Then he shuddered to think how his youthful position
Was assailed by the age of his son the physician;
At some poems he glanced, had been sent to him lately,
And the metre and sentiment puzzled him greatly;
"Mehercle! I'd make such proceedings felonious,-
Have they all of them slept in the cave of Trophonius?
Look well to your seat, 'tis like taking an airing
On a corduroy road, and that out of repairing;
It leads one, 'tis true, through the primitive forest,

Grand natural features--but, then, one has no rest;
You just catch a glimpse of some ravishing distance,
When a jolt puts the whole of it out of existence,—
Why not use their ears, if they happen to have any ?"
-Here the laurel-leaves murmured the name of poor Daphne.

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"O, weep with me, Daphne," he sighed, "for you know it's

A terrible thing to be pestered with poets!

But, alas, she is dumb, and the proverb holds good,
She never will cry till she's out of the wood!

What wouldn't I give if I never had known of her?
'Twere a kind of relief had I something to groan over;
If I had but some letters of hers, now, to toss over,
I might turn for the nonce a Byronic philosopher,
And bewitch all the flats by bemoaning the loss of her.
One needs something tangible, though, to begin on-
A loom, as it were, for the fancy to spin on;
What boots all your grist? it can never be ground
Till a breeze makes the arms of the windmill
go round,

(Or, if 'tis a water-mill, alter the metaphor,
And say it won't stir, save the wheel be well wet afore,
Or lug in some stuff about water SO dreamily,"-

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It is not a metaphor, though, 'tis a simile ;)

A lily, perhaps, would set my mill agoing,
For just at this season, I think, they are blowing,

Here, somebody, fetch one, not very far hence

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They're in bloom by the score, 'tis but climbing a fence;
There's a poet hard by, who does nothing but fill his
Whole garden, from one end to t'other, with lilies;
A very good plan, were it not for satiety,

One longs for a weed here and there, for variety;
Though a weed is no more than a flower in disguise,
Which is seen through at once, if love give a man eyes.

Now there happened to be among Phœbus's followers, A gentleman, one of the omnivorous swallowers

Who bolt every book that comes out of the press,
Without the least question of larger or less,

Whose stomachs are strong at the expense of their head,—

For reading new books is like eating new bread,
One can bear it at first, but by gradual steps he
Is brought to death's door of a mental dyspepsy.
On a previous stage of existence, our Hero
Had ridden outside, with the glass below zero;
He had been, 'tis a fact you may safely rely on,
Of a very old stock a most eminent scion,—

A stock all fresh quacks their fierce boluses ply on,
Who stretch the new boots Earth's unwilling to try on,
Whom humbugs of all shapes and sorts keep their eye on,
Whose hair 's in the mortar of every new Zion,

Who, when whistles are dear, go directly and buy one,
Who think Slavery a crime that we must not say fie on,

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