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Bayou, or Iberville river, as it was first named; the Lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain, the Mississippi river and the Gulf of Mexico, explains why, in France, our city was always referred to as “the Island of Orleans," since it was surrounded by water. That it is not an island to-day as it was in Bienville's days is due to the fear felt by General Jackson, in 1814, that the English would creep up through the lakes and enter the rear of New Orleans through this very available Manchac Bayou gateway, and he ordered the steam to be “dammed”—that is, closed up.

Prof. Deiler stated that such a historic spot as Bayou Manchac, or Iberville river, ought to be marked by tablets “to keep alive important traditions."

The order to remove headquarters to Biloxi was being obeyed when Bienville was surprised by dispatches from France to the effect that he had been appointed president of the Supreme Council, and that body gave him absolute power to establish Louisiana's principal city on the banks of the Father of Waters. He had picked the site in 1718, but it was not until 1723 that his long-desired wish was carried out, and the troops, stores, etc., were removed to New Orleans. He took up his residence in this city by the sea, and was at different times Governor and commander in-chief until 1743.

When will the city he founded raise a statue to his memory, if only for the poor, unworthy reason of perpetuating the fact that, through his persistent zeal, devotion and foresight, the city of Louisiana was not founded at Natchez, Bay St. Bernard or Manchac, but on the site which, after the opening of the Panama Canal, seems destined to become one of the greatest cities of the world?

MRS. S. B. ELDER.

Mr. Hart read the following letter from Mayor Behrman to the president of the society, conveying letters from Secretary of State Lansing and Mr. Page, Ambassador of the United States to the Court of St. James, concerning the presentation of the gold medal of the society commemorating the Centenary of Peace January 8th, 1915, to King George V. of England. Mr. Page said he had presented the medal in person and the King expressed his appreciation of the gift.

On motion of Mr. Hart, duly seconded and carried, the letters from the Mayor, the Secretary of State and the American Ambassador are to be made part of the minutes of the society and are to be printed in the society's proceed. ings.

STATE OF LOUISIANA,
MAYORALTY OF NEW ORLEANS.
MARTIN BEHRMAN, Mayor.

City Hall, July 20th, 1915. Mr. Gaspar Cusach, President, Louisiana Historical Society,

City: MY DEAR SIR—I take pleasure in transferring to the keeping of the Louisiana Historical Society the enclosed copy of a letter from the American Ambassador at London, relative to the presentation to His Majesty, King George V of a gold medal as a souvenir of the New Orleans Peace Centenary Celebration; also a letter from the Honorable Robert Lansing, Secretary of State, regarding the same subject.

These letters relate to one of the happiest incidents in the great celebration in this city January 8th last, and are surely worthy of preservation. In making this formal disposition of them, I am prompted by the assurance that in no other hands would they receive such devoted care—would they be so sedulously guarded—nor their significance so understood and appreciated as by the Louisiana Historical Society. To no other organization, public or private, in this State, would these interesting documents mean so much, conveying as they do a deserving tribute to the voluntary, unselfish and patriotic efforts of your society in inaugurating and bringing to a successful consummation one of the most impressive celebrations in the history of this country.

Very truly yours,

MARTIN BEHRMAN, Mayor.

STATE OF LOUISIANA,
MAYORALTY OF NEW ORLEANS.

MARTIN BEHRMAN, Mayor.

City Hall, July 8th, 1915. Mr. W. 0. Hart, 134 Carondelet Street, City:

DEAR SIR—I have been directed by Mayor Behrman to enclose herewith for your information, letter from Hon. Robert Lansing, Secretary of State, together with copy of dispatch from the American Ambassador at London, relative to the presentation to His Majesty, King George V, of a medal in honor of the New Orleans Peace Centenary celebra

tion.

Very truly yours,

JOHN P. COLEMAN,

Secretary to Mayor.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

WASHINGTON, July 1, 1915. The Mayor of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana:

SIR—The Department encloses herewith for your information a copy of a despatch, dated the 7th ultimo., from the American Ambassador at London concerning the presentation to His Majesty King George V of a medal in honor of the New Orleans Peace Centenary celebration. I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

ROBERT LANSING.

LONDON, June 7, 1915. The Honorable, the Secretary of State, Washington:

SIR—I have the honor to report that some time since I received an intimation from His Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs that at the New Orleans Peace Centenary celebration in January last a gold medal which had been specially struck in honor of the occasion was handed to the British representative (His Majesty's Consul-General at New Orleans) for transmission to the King, and that it had been received at the Foreign Office through the Embassy at Washington. A duplicate of the medal has been, it was understood, presented to the President.

Sir Edward Grey was good enough to invite me to present the medal to the King in person which, pursuant to his request, I had the honor of doing this morning.

I was received in private audience by the King at Buckingham Palace and handed him the medal on behalf of the authorities of the New Orleans Peace Centenary. In accepting it His Majesty requested me to convey to the donors on his behalf his appreciative thanks for the gift, which he was happy to receive.

I should be much obliged therefore if you would be so good as to cause an appropriate message, in this sense, to be conveyed to the authorities of the New Orleans Peace Centenary Celebration. I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,

WALTER HINES PAGE.

STATE OF LOUISIANA. MAYORALTY OF NEW ORLEANS. . MARTIN BEHRMAN, Mayor.

City Hall, July 12, 1915. Mr. W. 0. Hart, 134 Carondelet Street, City:

MY DEAR SIR-I have been directed by Mayor Behrman to acknowledge receipt of your favor of the 10th instant, and in reply thereto to express his regret that it will be impossible for him to attend the meeting of the Louisiana Historical Society on the morning of the 21st instant. He will, however, take pleasure in forwarding to the Association a letter making formal presentation to it of the official documents received from the Secretary of State in relation to the gold medal presented by your Association to the King of England.

The Mayor thanks you for your courteous consideration of him in this matter.

Very truly yours,

JOHN P. COLEMAN,
Secretary to Mayor.

BRITISH EMBASSY.

WASHINGTON, June 11, 1915. The Chairman, General Committee of the Louisiana His

torical Society, New Orleans, La. SIR—The medal which was specially struck to celebrate the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the battle of New Orleans and the Centenary of Peace between the United States and Great Britain was duly forwarded to London. I am informed that it was presented to the King by the American Ambassador on June 7th.

I am commanded by His Majesty to convey to the Historical Society of New Orleans his appreciative thanks for the medal, which he accepts with pleasure. The King also desires that you and those associated with you should know that he feels especial gratification at the circumstances in which it was presented, and that he will cherish it as a memento of a celebration which, he is informed, was marked on all sides by the greatest good will.

I should be much obliged if you would kindly make known the gentlemen to whom the King is indebted for the medal the feeling of gratitude with which their courtesy and thoughtfulness have inspired him.

Believe me to be, Sir,
Yours faithfully,

CECIL SPRING Rice.

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