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and the affability of his behaviour, left," and for which all remedies the favourite of Pope, Swift, Ad. were ineffectual, from that time dison, and all the beaux esprits. he led a retired and private life; The former being one dey in com and, being secluded from mixed pany at Lord Cobhan:’s with a great companies, made his eyes supply number of people of diftinction, the defects of his ears, by amusing who were scribbling rhimes on their himself with his books and his

pen; glasses, was desired by Lord Chef- in particular, engaging largely, as terfield to oblige them with a distich a volunteer, in the periodical work ex tempore.

Favour me with your called The World, published in 1753, diamond, my lord, said the poet, by Mr. Moore, where his lordship's and immediately after wrote the papers are most distinguishably exfollowing elegant compliment' on cellent. The late earl of Corke, his glass :

a genius of the same rank, in a let

ter from Blackheath in 1760, says, Accept a miracle instead of wit- “Our neighbourhood, tho' lordly, See two bad lines by Stanhope's is good.

Lord Chefterfield, except pencil writ.

deafness, is still Lord Chesterfield,

He speaks and writes with all the Even the foreign ministers, and Stanhope fire. Lady Chesterfield other illustrious ftrangers, allowed is goodness itself, &c." that he was a perfect master of the His lordship had no issue by his beauties of the French and Italian lady, but he had a son by Madame languages, and had an uncommon du Bouchet, (a French lady, whose knowledge of poetry, ftatuary, ar education and settlement in life chitecture, and the fine arts. grossed his whole attention, and to

A copy of verses on the royal fa- whom he wrote the letters lately pubmily was handed about at that time lished. He could not leave his estate which gave great offence to the to this promising youth, as he was king, who having declared he was nut legitimate ; he therefore encertain it was written by Lord deavoured to raise him a fortune by Chesterfield, the latter fent his ma prudent economy, and replenish jefty an epiftle in verse, in which his mind with the fruits of that exhe denied the charge, and with perience which he had gleaned in equal wit and severity told that the world. monarch how he would have ex. Young Stanhope, however, did pressed himself upon the subject. not'live to be much benefited by his As the fatyrist, however, in these father's frugality ; nor did his in. lines did not get the better of the structions turn to so much account gentleman, the king, not knowing as might have been expected : but, where to fix his resentment, grew perhaps a few years more might rather alhamed than angry, and it have brought them to maturity. in fome degree contributed to heal From the death of his son, Lord the breach between them.

Chesterfield was almost entirely deBeing seized with a deafness in nied to the world, seldom appearthe year 1752, “ which cut him off ing in public, and associating only (as he says) from society, at an age with a few friends. when he had no pleasures but those

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We shall only add, that his lord. “ Verses written in a lady's Sher. Thip died March 24, 1773, and was lock on Death,” &c -- We cannot succeeded in his titles and estates by conclude, without wishing that his Philip Stanhope, Esq; son of his lordship had made his will earlier kiníman Arthur Stanhope, Erg; de- in life, as then he would probably cealed; lineally descended from have avoided some glaring incon. the first Earl of Chesterfield. His fiftencies, which age and infirmities Lordship's character, in which, for only can excuse in a man of his tawit and abilities, and especially for lents and good-nature. Such are, elocution or oratory, he had few 1. His forbidding his heir to go equals, requires a pen or a tongue into Italy, though he had thought like his own. An Apelles only can an Italian education" of the utmost draw an Alexander. His friend consequence to his son ; and his Pope has celebrated him, together committing “ the absolute care of with the late Lord Bath :

this heir's education” to a nobleman

who is known to have a predilection “ How can I Pulteney, Chester. for that country, and generally refield forget,

sides there. 2. His leaving the While Roman spirit charms, or mother of his late natural son but Attic wit!”

sool. 3. His styling his servants

' his “ unfortunate friends, his equals If his morals had been as unexcep. by nature,&c. and then leaving tionable, he would indeed have them two years wages only; and to been the wonder of his age. His two, whom he calls “s old and faith. propensity to gaming, and, if we ful,” who had spent their lives in may so say, his cullibility, were his service, not more than 50 guineas most notorious: these, and some each. 4. His not so much as menother youthful vices, he frankly tioning his excellent lady, whose confesses in his letters, at the same character ought to have given him time that he seems unconscious of a much better opinion of the whole many other failures in moral duty, fex. . particularly of the baseness of se. He was buried privately (as he duction and adultery, which even desired) in the vault under Audleythe licentiousness of France cannot chapel, being the next buryingexcuse a father's teaching and in- place to Chesterfield-house. culcating to his son. Though Lord Chesterheld seldom exerted his poe

Memoirs of the Life and Writings of tical talent but in epigrams and bal. lads, the few that are known to be

the late George Lord Lyttelton. his are evidently by the hand of a The family of this accomplish. master: witness his « Fanny bloom. T ed nobleman has been distin. ing fair” (said to be written on guished in this kingdom for many Lady Fanny Shirley), “ Advice to centuries past. His ancestors had a lady in Autumn" (supposed to be possessions in the vale of Evesham, to ihe same), his epigram “ on the in the reign of Henry III. particu. late Duchess of Richmond” (mis- larly at South-Lyttelton, from which printed, in the Foundring Hospital place fome antiquarians have assert. for Wit, Duchess of Rutland), ed they took their name. There

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were two grants of land belonging struck with the extraordinary capato Evesham-abbey, in the possession city of our young traveller, that he of the late learned Mr. Seldon, to

invited him to his house, and em-
which one John de Lyttelton was ployed him in many political nego.
witness, in the year 1160. The ciations, which he executed with
great Judge Lyttelton, in the reign great judgment and fidelity.
of Henry IV. was one of this fa The good opinion Mr. Poyntz
mily, and from him descended Sir entertained of Mr. Lyttelton's cha-

Thomas Lyttelton, father of the racter and abilities is teftified in a
late peer, who was appointed a lord letter under his own hand to his
of the admiralty in the year 1727 ; father, in which he expresses hima
which post he resigned many years self as follows :
afterwards, on account of the bad
ftate of his health.

To Sir Thomas Lyttelton, Bart.
This gentleman married Chrif-
tian, daughter to Sir Richard Tem-
ple, "lister of the late Lord Viscount I received your two kind letters,
Cobham, and maid of honour .to in which you are pleased very much
Queen Anne, by whom he had fix to over-value the small civilities it
fons and fix daughters, the eldest of has lain in my power to thew Mr.
which was George, afterwards cre. Lyttelton. I have more reason to
ated Lord Lyttelton, who was born thank you, Sir, for giving me so
at Hagley in Worcestershire, one of convincing a mark of your regard,
the most beautiful rural retirements as to interrupt the course of his tra-
in this kingdom, in the year 1708. vels on my account, which will lay

He received the elements of his me under a double obligation to do education at Eton-school, where he all I can towards making his stay fhewed an early inciination to poe. agreeable and useful to him; though try. His pastorals and some other I Thall still remain the greater gainer light pieces were originally written by the pleasure of his company, in that feminary of learning, from which no services of mine can sufwhence he was removed to the Uni- ficiently requite. He is now in the versity of Oxford, where he pursued lame house with me, and by that his claffical studies with uncommon means, more constantly under my avidity, and sketched the plan of eye than even at Soissons; but I his Persian Letters, a work which should be very unjust to him, if I afterwards procured him great re left you under the imagination, putation, not only from the elegance that his inclinations fand in the of the language in which they were leaft need of any such ungenerous composed, but from the excellent restraint : Depend upon it, Sir, observations they contained on the from the observation of one who manners of mankind.

would abhor to deceive a father in In the year 1728 he set out on so tender a point, that he retains the tour of Europe, and on his ar the same virtuous and studious disrival at Paris, accidentally became positions, which nature and your acquainted with the Honourable care planted in him, only strengthMr. Poyntz, then our minister at ened and improved by age and ex. the court of Versailles, who was so perience ; fo that, I'dare promise

you,

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We shall only add, that his lord. “ Verses written in a lady's Sher. fhip died March 24, 1773, and was lock on Death,” &c --We cannot succeeded in his titles and estates by. conclude, without wishing that his Philip Stanhope, Esq; fon of his lordship had made his will earlier kinsman Arthur Stanhope, Efq;de- in life, as then he would probably Ceased; lineally descended from have avoided some glaring inconthe firit Earl of Chesterfield. His fiftencies, which age and infirmities lordship's character, in which, for only can excuse in a man of his ta. wit and abilities, and especially for lents and good-nature. Such are, elocution or oratory, he had few 1. His forbidding his heir to go equals, requires a pen or a tongue into Italy, though he had thought like his own. An Apelles only can an Italian education" of the utmost draw an Alexander. His friend consequence to his fon; and his Pope has celebrated him, together committing

" the absolute care of with the late Lord Bath :

this heir's education" to a nobleman

who is known!o have a predilection “ How can I Pulteney, Chester- for that country, and generally refield forget,

sides there. 2. His leaving the While Roman spirit charms; or mother of his late natural son but Attic wit!"

sool. 3. His styling his servants

his “ unfortunate friends, his equals If his morals had been as unexcep. by nature, " &c. and then leaving tionable, he would indeed have them two years wages only; and to been the wonder of his age. His two, whom he calls «s old and faith. propensity to gaming, and, if we ful,” who had spent their lives in may so say, his cullibility, were his service, not more than 50 guineas most notorious: these, and some each. 4. His not so much as menother youthful vices, he frankly tioning his excellent lady, whose confesses in his letters, at the same character ought to have given him time that he seems unconscious of a much better opinion of the whole many other failures in moral duty, fex. particularly of the baseness of se He was buried privately (as he duction and adultery, which even desired) in the vault under A udleythe licentiousness of France cannot chapel, being the next burying. excuse a father's teaching and in place to Chesterfield-house. culcating to his son. Though Lord Chesterfield feldom exerted his

poetical talent but in epigrams and bal- Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Jads, the few that are known to be

the late George Lord Lyttelton. his are evidently by the hand of a master: witness his “

ed nobleman has been distining fair” (said to be written on guished in this kingdom for many Lady Fanny Shirley), “ Advice to centuries past. His ancestors had a lady in Autumn" (supposed to be possessions in the vale of Evelham, to the fame), his epigram " on the in the reign of Henry III. particu. late Duchess of Richmond” (mif- larly at South-Lyttelton, from which printed, in the Founding Hopital place fome antiquarians have affert. for Wit, Duchess of Rutland), ed they took their name. There

were

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were two grants of land belonging struck with the extraordinary capato Evesham-abbey, in the possession city of our young traveller, that he of the late learned Mr. Seldon, to

invited him to his house, and em-
which one John de Lyttelton was ployed him in many political nego.
witness, in the year 1160. The' ciations, which he executed with
great Judge Lyttelton, in the reign great judgment and fidelity.
of Henry IV. was one of this fa. The good opinion Mr. Poyntz
mily, and from him descended Sir entertained of Mr. Lyttelton's cha-

Thomas Lyttelton, father of the racter and abilities is testified in a
late peer, who was appointed a lord letter under his own hand to his
of the admiralty in the year 1727; father, in which he expresses him.
which poft he resigned many years self as follows :
afterwards, on account of the bad
ftate of his health.

To Sir Thomas Lyttelton, Bart.
This gentleman married Chris-

SIR, tian, daughter to Sir Richard Temple, lister of the late Lord Viscount I received your two kind letters, Cobham, and maid of honour to in which you are pleased very much Queen Anne, by whom he had fix to over-value the small civilities it fons and fix daughters, the eldest of has lain in my power to shew Mr. which was George, afterwards cre Lyttelton. I have more reason to ated Lord Lyttelton, who was born thank you, Sir, for giving me so at Hagley in Worceftershire, one of convincing a mark of your regard, the most beautiful rural retirements as to interrupt the course of his train this kingdom, in the year 1708. vels on my account, which will lay

He received the elements of his me under a double obligation to do education at Eton-school, where he all I can towards making his stay fhewed an early inciination to poe- agreeable and useful to him; though try. His pastorals and some other I shall still remain the greater gainer light pieces were originally written by the pleasure of his company, in that seminary of learning, from which no services of mine can fuf. whence he was removed to the Uni- ficiently requite. He is now in the versity of Oxford, where he pursued fame house with me, and by that his classical studies with uncommon means, more constantly under my avidity, and sketched the plan of eye than even at Soiffons ; but I his Persian Letters, a work which mould be very unjust to him, if I afterwards procured him great re left you under the imagination, putation, not only from the elegance that his inclinations fand in the of the language in which they were leaft need of any such ungenerous composed, but from the excellent restraint : Depend upon it, Sir, observations they contained on the from the observation of one who manners of mankind.

would abhor to deceive a father in In the year 1728 he set out on so tender a point, that he retains the tour of Europe, and on his ar

the same virtuous and studious difrival at Paris, accidentally became positions, which nature and your acquainted with the Honourable care planted in him, only strengthMr. Poyntz, then our minister atened and improved by age and exthe court of Versailles, who was so perience; fo that, I'dare promise

you,

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