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The profession, &c. of the fathers of the candidates at the recent examination are stated as follows:

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The number of candidates who have been examined in the several subjects specified in the Regulations is shown by the following Table :

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The following gentlemen undertook the duty of examining in the subjects set opposite to their names :—

Dr. Dasent and

Professor Craik.

Rev. Dr. Donaldson and

-{Rev. W. E. Buckley.

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M. Dupont.

Max Müller, Esq.
Professor Arrivabene.
Monier Williams, Esq.

Col. Ouseley.

Rev. Dr. Graves and

Rev. J. W. L. Heaviside.

G. D. Liveing, Esq.

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A. Bain, Esq.

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།་་་་་།

I OSURE.

G. L. Craik, Esq., Professor of History and
Queen's College, Belfast.

in English for the Indian Civil Service, the xaminations, though laborious to the examiners, essarily consume, are highly advantageous, since adiness of the candidate be so fairly tested, or cted; while, at the same time, an opportunity is any error which he may have made, through ne examination. They have no hesitation, thereal examinations, as supplementary and ancilliary ritten answers to printed questions, form a most stem, and ought on no account to be abandoned. oral examinations should be made as public as publicity will best secure the efficiency of the he candidate.

(Signed)

G. W. DASENT, D.C.L.

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London, 6th August 1858. e of my duty to indicate those who appear to me ments in India about to be bestowed as the prizes of Dosed three papers which I found to be adequate tests ubjected the candidates to a searching oral examinaupplement to all work on paper (for when employed cramming useless, exposes plausible ignorance, and advantage gained by lucky anticipations)-I may at the Commissioners will find among these young ell qualified to enter upon the Indian Civil Service to the public.""

ted to publish the following statement from the Rev. the University of Dublin.

e distributed as the rewards of those who are most it becomes a matter of general interest to determine his was a question only for those who were engaged in the present day it concerns the public at large. In the the examinations is carried on by means of papers. orted to, and I have been informed that there is ng disposition to adopt this method.

ed voce examination is regarded as an essential part fellows and professors hold that no examination, thout some viva voce.

hought advisable in a college examination, it might which is to test the fitness of the candidates to ral, does a man fail to answer a question proposed cases, for the very simple and sufficient reason are other reasons. He may have known the mental digestion, he has not assimilated the If as to respond instantly to the demand of him, he may be acquainted with certain of deduction, he might derive the answer. of head that would enable him to make of a vivá voce examination. Give him and he might work out the proposed

of the utmost value in the ordinary hey have not been paying sufficient Correct attempts made by others, iner occasionally lets fall. Now, mind, and a sagacity in taking sons who possess them, what defects of sluggish inattention,

hich is well defined, are, and e will be subjected to a long of hurried cramming. I etween these two classes of nination.

ing out proofs of leading manner almost mechanical, ledge. It may be only

1 by a candidate who on what principles enumerate the chief

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Of these the under-mentioned, viz :—

Mr. Buckley,

Mr. Heaviside,

Colonel Ouseley, and

Mr. Monier Williams,

gave their services, in accordance with the arrangement made at the closing of Haileybury College; but Mr. Buckley being suddenly summoned from town by the illness of a near relative, his place in the vivâ voce examination was supplied by T. Walrond, Esq., Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford, the senior assistant examiner permanently employed at this office.

The examination was held partly at Burlington House (by permission of the Senate of the University of London and the Royal Society) and partly at this Office.

The only alteration in the conduct of the examination sufficiently important to deserve mention in this place was the extension of vivâ voce examination. In the two preceding years candidates had been examined vivâ voce in English, and in the language and literature of Greece and Rome; but it appeared to the Commissioners desirable to apply the same test in the case of the other subjects also, and they have every reason to believe that the alteration has been a beneficial one. They enclose, for the perusal of the Commissioners for the Affairs of India, extracts from the reports of several of the gentlemen who have assisted them.

The Commissioners observe with satisfaction that the candidates who have distinguished themselves in particular subjects, occupy, for the most part, very high places on the general list. Mr. Geoghegan, the first in mathematics, is also first on the whole. Mr. Smith, who stands first in the English portion of the examination, is second on the whole; Mr. Tyrrell, the first in classics, is third; and Mr. Fitzpatrick, the first in natural sciences and in moral sciences, is sixth.

It may be added that 15 of the selected candidates are among the first 20 in the English subjects, and that 15 are among the first 20 in classics. The candidates who appear among the first 20 in both lists are the following:

Mr. Geoghegan.
Mr. Tyrrell.

Mr. Smith.

Mr. Watts.

Mr. Wynne.
Mr. Sperling.
Mr. Gardner.

Mr. Powlett.

Mr. Whinfield.

Mr. Eades.

Mr. Brown.

Mr. Armstrong.
Mr. MacGregor.

The Commissioners have only to add that the Enclosure marked No. 1 contains the names of all the candidates, and that No. 2* shows the marks obtained by each candidate in the several subjects, the unsuccessful candidates being represented by numbers only. I have, &c.

*This is printed at p. 326...

ENCLOSURE.

From G. W. Dasent, Esq., D.C.L., and G. L. Craik, Esq., Professor of History and English Literature in Queen's College, Belfast.

ON reviewing the recent examination in English for the Indian Civil Service, the examiners entertain no doubt that oral examinations, though laborious to the examiners, from the amount of time which they necessarily consume, are highly advantageous, since by no other means can the natural readiness of the candidate be so fairly tested, or cramming and copying be so easily detected; while, at the same time, an opportunity is afforded to the candidate of retrieving any error which he may have made, through inadvertence, in the written portion of the examination. They have no hesitation, therefore, in declaring their opinion that oral examinations, as supplementary and ancilliary to those conducted in the form of written answers to printed questions, form a most important branch of the competitive system, and ought on no account to be abandoned. They would also recommend that these oral examinations should be made as public as possible, for they are sure that such publicity will best secure the efficiency of the examiner and protect the interests of the candidate. G. W. DASENT, D.C.L.

18th August 1858.

I cordially concur in every word of the above.

(Signed)

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(Extract.)

From the Rev. Dr. Donaldson.

London, 6th August 1858. "IT does not fall within the scope of my duty to indicate those who appear to me generally best fitted for the appointments in India about to be bestowed as the prizes of this examination. But having proposed three papers which I found to be adequate tests of literary proficiency, and having subjected the candidates to a searching oral examination, which I regard as a necessary supplement to all work on paper (for when employed by a competent examiner it makes cramming useless, exposes plausible ignorance, and deprives a candidate of any undue advantage gained by lucky anticipations)-I ́may venture to express my conviction that the Commissioners will find among these young men a sufficient number of persons well qualified to enter upon the Indian Civil Service with credit to themselves and benefit to the public.'

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The Commissioners are also permitted to publish the following statement from the Rev. Dr. Graves, Professor of Mathematics in the University of Dublin.

"Now that public appointments are distributed as the rewards of those who are most successful in competitive examinations, it becomes a matter of general interest to determine the best mode of examining. Formerly this was a question only for those who were engaged in the business of schools or colleges. In the present day it concerns the public at large. In the English universities the greater part of the examinations is carried on by means of papers. Still, oral questioning is occasionally resorted to, and I have been informed that there is amongst university examiners an increasing disposition to adopt this method.

"In the university to which I belong viva voce examination is regarded as an essential part of our system, and I believe all my brother fellows and professors hold that no examination, whether scientific or literary, is perfect without some viva voce.

"But, even supposing that it were not thought advisable in a college examination, it might still be a necessary part of one the object of which is to test the fitness of the candidates to undertake public employments. Why, in general, does a man fail to answer a question proposed to him in a viva voce examination? In most cases, for the yery simple and sufficient reason that he does not know the answer. But there are other reasons. He may have known the answer at a former time, but, through a defect of mental digestion, he has not assimilated the knowledge and made it so much a part of himself as to respond instantly to the demand of recollection; or, suppose the question to be new to him, he may be acquainted with certain principles from which, by a step or two in the way of deduction, he might derive the answer. But he may want the presence of mind and clearness of head that would enable him to make these deductions rapidly enough to meet the exigencies of a vivá voce examination. Give him pen, ink, and paper, and impose no limit as to time, and he might work out the proposed question to a certainty.

"But is not such a man deficient in qualities which are of the utmost value in the ordinary business of life? Some men let the questions go by because they have not been paying sufficient attention to what is passing. They have not noticed the incorrect attempts made by others, neither have they profited by the helping hints which the examiner occasionally lets fall. Now, every one must admit that a habit of vigilance, concentration of mind, and a sagacity in taking hints are really valuable qualities in every-day work. To persons who possess them, what advantage do they give over those who labour under the opposite defects of sluggish inattention, or mercurial volatility, or actual obtuseness!

"Students intending to undergo an examination, the nature of which is well defined, are, and always will be, specially prepared for the trial by teachers. Some will be subjected to a long course of sound instruction; others will be put through a process of hurried cramming. venture to assert that the success of examiners in distinguishing between these two classes of candidates is greatly promoted by the introduction of viva voce examination.

"Mathematical students are exercised by their tutors in writing out proofs of leading propositions in various branches of science. They learn to do this in a manner almost mechanical, and with some the attainment affords a very imperfect test of their knowledge. It may be only the result of skilful cramming.

"A proposition of Euclid or of Newton may be quite correctly written out by a candidate who could not perceive the connexion of the parts of the proof, who could not tell on what principles it depended, who could not point out the leading steps in it, who could not enumerate the chief

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