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lution (H. R, 61) granting to the Secretary of the Treasury further time to make the report concerning the sale and entry of certain lands in Cincinnati.

They have passed the bill from the Senate (S. 411) to change the location of the land office in the Chippewa land district.

The Speaker of the House of Representatives having signed four enrolled bills, I am directed to bring them to the Senate for the signature of their President.

The resolution (H. R. 61) granting to the Secretary of the Treasury further time to make the report concerning the sale and entry of certain lands in Cincinnati, was read the first and second times by unanimous consent:

Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee on Public Lands.

Mr. Butler, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 804) to authorize the judge of the courts of the United States of the fifth circuit, to hold the circuit court for the district of Kentucky, reported the same without amendment.

The Senate proceeded to consider the said bill, as in Committee of the Whole, and no amendments being made, it was reported to the Senate.

Ordered, That it pass to a third reading.
The said bill was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass. .

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives thereof.

The Senate proceeded to consider, as in Committee of the Whole, the bill (H. R. 341) for the relief of Joel Thacker; and, no amendment being made, it was reported to the Senate.

Ordered, That it pass to a third reading.
The said bill was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass.

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives accordingly.

The Senate proceeded to consider the resolution submitted by Mr. Mason, the 18ih July, to authorize the employment of a clerk for the Committee of Claims; and

On motion by Mr. Turney, Ordered, That it lie on the table.

The Senate resumed, as in Committee of the Whole, the consideration of the bill (H. R. 803) to remit the duties upon certain goods destroyed by fire in the city of New York. An amendment having been proposed by Mr. Hunter,

On motion by Mr. Webster, Ordered, That the bill lie on the table.

Mr. Butler, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (S. 312) to amend an act more effectually to provide for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States, and for other purposes, approved March 3, 1825, and an act authorizing the issue of treasury notes, a loan, and for other purposes, approved January 28, 1847, reported it without amendment.

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Mr. Westcott, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (S. 262) to amend the act approved June 17, 1844, entitled an act to provide for the adjustment of land claims within the States of Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana, and those parts of the States of Mississippi and Alabama south of the 31st degree of north latitude, and between the Mississippi and Perdido rivers, reported it with an amendment.

Mr. Westcott, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the petition of Isaac W. Taylor and others, legal representatives of Jaques Clamorgan, deceased, submitted a report, accompanied by a bill (S. 489) amendatory of an act approved the 26th day of May, 1824, and re-enacted on the 17th day of June, 1844, entitled “ An act enabling, claimants to lands within the limits of the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas to institute proceedings to try the validity of their claims."

The bill was read and passed to the second reading.
Ordered, That the report be printed.

Mr. Westcott, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (S. 384) in addition to the act to regulate the exercise of the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United States, in certain cases, and for other purposes, approved February 23, 1847, reported it with an amendment.

Mr. Niles, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, to whom was referred the resolution of the Senate of the 22d February, 1849, respecting a contract with Edward Mills, submitted a report; which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Sebastian, from the Committee on Patents and the Patent Office, to whom was referred the petition of Peter U. Morgan, submitted a report; which was ordered to be printed.

On motion by Mr. Sebastian, Ordered, That leave be granted to the petitioner to withdraw the papers accompanying his petition.

On motion by Mr. Underwood, Ordered, That the Committee of Claims be discharged from the further consideration of the memorial of Maria L. Nourse.

Mr. Cameron, from the select committee on the census, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 813) to make arrangements for taking the seventh census, reported it without amendment.

The Vice President addressed the Senate as follows:

GENTLEMEN OF THE SENATE: The close of my official term being near at hand, I conform to an established and convenient practice, by withdrawing from the deliberations of this body, and thus creating the occasion for the choice of a temporary President.

It is impossible for me, however, to do this, without begging you, each and all, to accept my thanks for the courtesy and respect by which you have lightened the burden of my service in your chamber.

The elevated principle and dignified tone which mark the proceedings of the Senate; the frank and yet forbearing temper of its discussions; the mutual manifestations of conciliatory deference, so just and appropriate among the delegates of independent States; and the consequent calmness and precision of its legislative action, have attracted to it a very large share of veneration and confidence. Four years of experience convince me that this confidence is not misplaced. It is true that such an assembly, constantly handling topics of the widest bearing, of the highest and deepest concern to diversified constituencies, cannot avoid being occasionally disturbed by conflicting sentiments of patriotic duty, or by sudden impulses of feeling. But these transient disturbances are too intimately and obviously associated with representative fidelity, with unquestiona ble freedom of debate, and with a quick sense of public honor, to be subject to entire repression by the strictest rules of order. They are, indeed, rare, passing over the scene like flashes which do but startle, and then cease, and which serve only to exhibit in stronger relief the grave decorum of its general conduct. Long, forever, may this character be maintained in the Senate, strengthening, as it cannot fail to strengthen, the attachment of the American people to their admirable constitution of government.

You will, I trust, pardon me if I protract, for an instant, these parting words, in order to utter one or two sentiments, derived solely from my position as an agent of the nation.

A right to vote upon any question pending before this body when its members are equally divided, is given to the Vice President by the constitution; and the duty to exercise that right is imposed upon him by an express rule of the Senate.

Although it so happened that equal divisions have occurred, during my official term, with unusual frequency-not less than thirty times—and although no one can be insensible to the signal responsibility of giving to this or the other scale, on such contingencies, the final preponderance, I am not aware of having faltered in casting my suffrage as, in my conscience, I believe the people of the United States, and especially that vast majority of them whose judgments and affections cling with ever-renewing conviction and devotion to the harmony and duration of the Union, would have prescribed. Of the cardinal duties of American functionaries, I have deemed that to be the foremost which consists in practically upholding and exemplifying the beneficence, independent social organization, equality, and fraternity so distinctly and directly inculcated in the constitution. Nor, senators, is any man fit to participate in the government of great societies, with elements combined as ours are, who hesitates about disobliging the few who have access to or surround him, for the sake of the many whom he can never see. In these reflections lies the simple and safe rule of truly patriotic action. I am far from the self-flattery of supposing that the deciding votes, so often and sometimes so suddenly required at my hands, conformed unerringly to this rule; but I cannot repress the hope that time and trial will prove them to have been as positively right as I am absolutely certain they were rightly intended.

My draft, gentlemen, on your generous indulgence is a heavy one, when I ask you to forget or overlook the many imperfections with which the duties of the chair have been discharged. Its labors, occasionally more arduous and anxious, are always more absorbing than is generally supposed; and I undertook them with an oppressive consciousness of inexperience. Now that I am finally relieved from the burden, let me say that I shall take back to the private pursuits whence I was unexpectedly called the most grateful recollections of your kindness, and an ardent wish that your toils to advance the prosperity of a country beloved by us all may be rewarded by the purest public favor, and by prolonged lives of happiness and honor.

And, thereupon, in pursuance of the notice yesterday, retired from the chair.

On motion by Mr. Benton, and by unanimous consent, Resolved, That the Hon. David R. Atchison be appointed, in the absence of the Vice President, President of the Senate pro tempore.

On motion by Mr. Benton, Ordered, That the Secretary wait on the President of the United States, and inform him that the Senate, in the absence of the Vice President, have chosen the Hon. David R. Atchison President of the Senate pro tempore; and that he make a similar communication to the House of Representatives.

On motion by Mr. Webster, Resolved unanimously, That the thanks of the Senate 'are-due, and are hereby tendered to George M. Dallas, Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, for the dignity and impartiality with which he has presided over its deliberations.

Mr. Corwin, from the Committee on Public Lands, reported a resolution (S. R. 71) for a geological survey in detail; which was read and passed to the second reading,

Mr. Davis, of Mississippi, from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the resolution (S. R. 48) giving three months extra pay to all officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the volunteer service for, each term of enlistment during the lạte war with Mexico, reported it without amendment, and submitted a special report on the subject.

The following message was received from the President of the United States by Mr. Walker, his secretary: To the Senate of the United States:

I herewith transmit a communication from the Secretary of the Treasury, accompanying a report from the Solicitor of the Treas ury, presenting a view of the operations of that office since its organization.

JAMES K. POLK. WASHINGTON, March 2, 1849. The message was read.

Ordered, That it be printed with the accompanying documents, and that one thousand copies thereof be printed, in addition to the usual number, for the use of the department.

Mr. Corwin, from the Committee on Private Land Claims, reported a bill (S. 490) for the relief of Charles G. Gunter; which was read the first and second times by unanimous consent, and considered as in Committee of the Whole, and no amendment being made, it was reported to the Senate.

Ordered, That it be engrossed and read a third time.
The said bill was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass, and that the title thereof be as aforesaid.

Ordered, That the Secretary request the concurrence of the House of Representatives therein.

Mr. Pearce, from the Committee on the Library, to whom was referred the resolution from the House of Representatives (H. R. 58) authorizing the Secretary of the Senate and Clerk of the House of Representatives to subscribe for a thousand copies of a further publication of the debates and proceedings of Congress, and for other purposes, reported it without amendment.

The Senate proceeded to consider the said resolution as in Committee of the Whole; and no amendment being made, it was reported to the Senate.

Ordered, That it pass to a third reading.
The said resolution was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass.

Ordered, That the Secretary request the concurrence of the House of Representatives therein.

The Senate proceeded to consider, as in Committee of the Whole, the bill (H. R. 662) for the relief Elizabeth H. Cobbs; and,

On motion by Mr. Westcoit, Ordered, That it lie on the table.

Mr. Berrien, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 804) concerning the selection of jurors in certain courts of the United States, reported it without amendment.

The Senate proceeded to consider the said bill, as in Committee of the Whole; and no amendment being made, it was reported to the Senate.

Ordered, That it pass to a third reading. The said bill was read a third time. Resolved, That this bill pass. -Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives thereof.

Mr. Dodge, of Iowa, reported from the committee that they had examined and found duly enrolled the following acts:

H. R. 282. An act for the relief of Elizur B. Canfield;

H. R. 401. An act for the relief of Joshua Barney, United States agent;

H. R. 725. An act for the relief of B. 0. Payne, of Albany, New York;

H.R. 802. An act for the relief of the citizens of Cedar Bluff, in the State of Alabama, and for other purposes.

The president pro tempore signed the four enrolled bills last reported to have been examined; and they were delivered to the committee to be presented to the President of the United States.

The Senate proceeded to consider the resolution submitted by

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