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The following is the form, or model, of the inscription:

No. Cupon de pesos fuertes de renta pagadero en

de de

183 Cupon No.1o.

Renta perpetua de España,

pagadera en Paris

á razon de 5 p. 0-0 al año,
inscrita en el gran libro de la Deuda consolidada.

de

Esta Inscripcion se expide á consecuencia de un con-
venio celebrado en Madrid en de
entre S. M. Catolica la Reyna de España y los Estados
Unidos de America, para el pago de las reclamaciones

de los ciudadanos de dichos Estados.

INSCRIPCION No.
Capital.

Renta.
Pesos fuertes

Pesos fuertes
ó sean francos

ó sean francos
El portador de la presente tiene derecho á una
renta anual de pesos fuertes, ó sea de francos,
pagaderos en Paris por semestres, en los dias de y
de por los banqueros de España en aquella capital,
á razon de 5 francos y 40 centimos por peso fuerte, con
arreglo al Ri. decreto de 15 de Diciembre de 1825.

Consiguiente al mismo real decreto se destina cada
aña á la amortizacion de esta renta uno por ciento de su
valor nominal, á interes compuesto, cuyoimporte sera
empleado en su amortizacion periodica al curso corri-
ente por dichos banqueros.

- Madrid, de de
El Secretario de Estado y del Despacho de Hacienda.

El Director de la Ri. Caja de Amortizacion.

In witness whereof we, the undersigned Plenipotentiaries of H. Catholic M. the Queen of Spain and of the United States of America, have signed this model, and have affixed thereunto our seals. Done at Madrid, this

day of (SEAL.]

JOSÉ DE HEREDIA. SEAL.

C. P. VAN NESS.

The commission to determine the claims under the convention authorized by act of Congress June 7, 1836 (U. S. Stats., vol. 5, p. 34), met in Washington July 31, 1836, and adjourned January 31, 1838, awarding $549,850.28 to the claimants. The payment of the interest is made perpetual by the convention.

1877.

EXTRADITION CONVENTION.

Concluded January 5, 1877; ratification advised by the Senate Febru

ary 9, 1877; ratified by the President February 14, 1877; ratifications exchanged February 21, 1877; proclaimed February 21, 1877. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 1027.)

This convention of twelve articles contained the usual provisions for the extradition of fugitives from justice.

8. Doc. 318, 58-2-46

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1882.

TRADE-MARK CONVENTION. Concluded June 19, 1882; ratification advised by the Senate July 5,

1882; ratified by the President April 4, 1883; ratifications exchanged April 19, 1883; proclaimed April 19, 1883. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 1036.)

This convention of three articles contained the usual reciprocal agreements for the protection of trade-marks and manufactured articles.

1882. SUPPLEMENTARY EXTRADITION CONVENTION." Concluded August 7, 1882; ratification advised by the Senate February

27, 1883; ratified by the President April 4, 1883; ratifications exchanged April 19, 1883; proclaimed April 19, 1883. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 1037.)

By the articles of this supplementary convention to the Extradition Convention of 1877, additions were made to the list of extraditable offenses, and an agreement made for the temporary detention of criminals and the cooperation of both governments to secure the arrest and delivery of the criminals demanded.

1898.

TREATY OF PEACE. Concluded at Paris December 10, 1898; ratification advised by the

Senate February 6, 1899; ratified by the President February 6, 1899; ratifications exchanged April 11, 1899; proclaimed April 11, 18.9. (U. S. Stats., vol. 30, p. 1754.)

ARTICLES. I. Relinquishment of Cuba.

X. Religious freedom. II. Cession of Porto Rico, Guam, etc, XI. Legal rights in ceded or relinIII. Cission of Philippine Islands.

quished territory. IV. Spanish trade with the Philip- XII. Determination of pending judipines.

cial proceedings. V. Return of Spanish soldiers from XIII. Privileges of copyrights and patManila; evacuation of Philip

ents preserved in ceded terri. pines and Guam.

tories. VI. Release of prisoners.

XIV. Consular privileges. VII. Relinquishment of claims.

XV. Mutual privileges of shipping VIII. Property relinquished and ceded

charges. IX. Property and civil rights of per- XVI. Obligations of Cuba. sons in ceded territory.

XVII. Ratification. a Federal cases: Oteiza y Cortes 14. Jacobus, 136 U.S., 330; Castro r". De Uriarte. 12 Fed. Rep., 250, 16 Fed. Rep., 93; In re Cortes, 42 Fed. Rep., 47; Ex parte Ortiz. 100 Fed. Rep., 955.

Dooley v. United States, 182 U. S., 222, 183 U.S., 151; Pepke v. United States. 183 U.S., 176; De Lima v. Bidwell, 182 U.S., 1; Goetze v. United States, 182 U.S. 221, 103 Fed. Rep., 72; Armstrong v. United States, 182 U. S., 243; Downes v. Bidwell, 182 U.S., 244; Huus v. New York and Porto Rico Steamship Company, 182 U. S., 392; Crossman v. United States, 182 U. S..

221; Armstrong v. Bidwell, 124 Fed. Rep., 690; De Pass v. Bidwell, 124 Fed. Rep.. 615; American Sugar Refining Company v. Bidwell, 124 Fed. Rep., 677, 124 Fed. Rep., 683; Howell r. Bidwell, 124 Fed. Rep., 688.

The United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain, in the name of her august son Don Alfonso XIII, desiring to end the state of war now existing between the two countries, have for that purpose appointed as plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States,

William R. Day, Cushman K. Davis, William P. Frye, George Gray, and Whitelaw Reid, citizens of the United States;

And Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain,

Don Eugenio Montero Ríos, president of the senate, Don Buenaventura de Abarzuza, senator of the Kingdom and ex-minister of the Crown; Don José de Garnica, deputy to the Cortes and associate justice of the supreme court; Don Wenceslao Ramirez de VillaUrrutia, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary at Brussels, and Don Rafael Cerero, general of division;

Who, having assembled in Paris, and having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form, have, after discussion of the matters before them, agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

Spain relinquishes all claim of sovereignty over and title to Cuba.

And as the island is, upon its evacuation by Spain, to be occupied by the United States, the United States will, so long as such occupation shall last, assume and discharge the obligations that may under international law result from the fact of its occupation, for the protection of life and property.

ARTICLE II.

Spain cedes to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and the island of Guam in the Marianas or Ladrones.

ARTICLE III.

Spain cedes to the United States the archipelago known as the Philippine Islands, and comprehending the islands lying within the following lines:

A line running from west to east along or near the twentieth parallel of north latitude, and through the middle of the navigable channel of Bachi, from the one hundred and eighteenth (118th) to the one hundred and twenty seventh (127th) degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich, thence along the one hundred and twenty seventh (127th) degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich to the parallel of four degrees and forty five minutes (4° 45') north latitude, thence along the parallel of four degrees and forty five minutes (4° 45') north latitude to its intersection with the meridian of longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees and thirty five minutes (119° 35') east of Greenwich, thence along the meridian of longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees and thirty five minutes (119° 35') east of Greenwich to the parallel of latitude seven degrees and forty minutes (7° 40') north, thence along the parallel of latitude of seven degrees and forty minutes (7° 40') north to its intersersection with the one hundred and sixteenth (116th) degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich, thence by a direct line to the intersection of the tenth (10th) degree parallel of north latitude with the one hundred and eighteenth (118th) degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich, and thence along the one hundred and eighteenth (118th) degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich to the point of beginning.

The United States will pay to Spain the sum of twenty million dollars (820,000,000) within three months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty.

ARTICLE IV.

The United States will, for the term of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty, admit Spanish ships and merchandise to the ports of the Philippine Islands on the same terms as ships and merchandise of the United States.

ARTICLE V.

The United States will, upon the signature of the present treaty, send back to Spain, at its own cost, the Spanish soldiers taken as prisoners of war on the capture of Manila by the American forces. The arms of the soldiers in question shall be restored to them.

Spain will, upon the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty, proceed to evacuate the Philippines, as well as the island of Guam, on terms similar to those agreed upon by the Commissioners appointed to arrange for the evacuation of Porto Rico and other islands in the West Indies, under the Protocol of August 12, 1898, which is to continue in force till its provisions are completely executed.

The time within which the evacuation of the Philippine Islands and Guain shall be completed shall be fixed by the two Governments. Stands of colors, uncaptured war vessels, small arms, guns of all calibres, with their carriages and accessories, powder, ammunition, livestock, and materials and supplies of all kinds, belonging to the land and naval forces of Spain in the Philippines and Guam, remain the property of Spain. Pieces of heavy ordnance, exclusive of field artillery, in the fortifications and coast defences, shall remain in their emplacements for the term of six months, to be reckoned from the exchange of ratifications of the treaty; and the United States may, in the meantime, purchase such material from Spain, if a satisfactory agreement between the two Governments on the subject shall be reached.

ARTICLE VI.

Spain will, upon the signature of the present treaty, release all prisoners of war, and all persons detained or imprisoned for political offences, in connection with the insurrections in Cuba and the Philippines and the war with the United States.

Reciprocally, the United States will release all persons made prisoners of war by the American forces, and will undertake to obtain the release of all Spanish prisoners in the hands of the insurgents in Cuba and the Philippines.

The Government of the United States will at its own cost returu to Spain and the Government of Spain will at its own cost return to the United States, Cuba, Porto-Rico, and the Philippines, according to the situation of their respective homes, prisoners released or caused to be released by them, respectively, under this article.

ARTICLE VII.

The United States and Spain mutually relinquish all claims for indemnity, national and individual, of every kind, of either Government, or of its citizens or subjects, against the other Government, that may have arisen since the beginning of the late insurrection in Cuba and prior to the exchange of ratifications of the present treaty, including all claims for indemnity for the cost of the war.

The United States will adjudicate and settle the claims of its citizens against Spain relinquished in this article.

ARTICLE VIII.

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In conformity with the provisions of Articles I, II, and III of this treaty, Spain relinquishes in Cuba, and cedes in Porto Rico and other islands in the West Indies, in the island of Guam, and in the Philippine Archipelago, all the buildings, wharves, barracks, forts, structures, public highways and other immovable property which, in conformity with law, belong to the public domain, and as such belong to the Crown of Spain.

And it is hereby declared that the relinquishment or cession, as the case may be, to which the preceding paragraph refers, cannot in any respect impair the property or rights which by law belong to the peaceful possession of property of all kinds, of provinces, municipalities, public or private establishments, ecclesiastical or civic bodies, or any other associations having legal capacity to acquire and possess property in the aforesaid territories renounced or ceded, or of private individuals, of whatsoever nationality such individuals may be.

The aforesaid relinquishment or cession, as the case may be, includes all documents exclusively referring to the sovereignty relinquished or ceded that may exist in the archives of the Peninsula. Where any document in such archives only in part relates to said sovereignty, a copy of such part will be furnished whenever it shall be requested. Like rules shall be reciprocally observed in favor of Spain in respect of documents in the archives of the islands above referred to.

In the aforesaid relinquishment or cession, as the case may be, are also included such rights as the Crown of Spain and its authorities possess in respect of the official archives and records, executive as well as judicial, in the islands above referred to, which relate to said islands or the rights and property of their inhabitants. Such archives and records shall be carefully preserved, and private persons shall without distinction have the right to require, in accordance with law, authenticated copies of the contracts, wills and other instruments forming part of notarial protocols or files, or which may be contained in the executive or judicial archives, be the latter in Spain or in the islands aforesaid.

ARTICLE IX.

Spanish subjects, natives of the Peninsula, residing in the territory over which Spain by the present treaty relinquishes or cedes her sovereignty, may remain in such territory or may remove therefrom, retaining in either event all their rights of property, including the right to sell or dispose of such property or of its proceeds; and they shall also have the right to carry on their industry, commerce and professions, being subject in respect thereof to such laws as are applicable to other foreigners. In case they remain in the territory they

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